Principles of Procedurally Just Policing


The Justice Collaboratory in conjunction with the National Initiative for Building Community Trust & Justice (NI), unveiled a new set of practical guidelines aimed at incorporating procedural justice into policing practices. Written for an audience of policy-makers and policing executives, these guidelines are meant to aide departments in adapting and developing policies that will strengthen legitimacy and trust in interactions with the communities they serve.

Principles of Procedurally Just Policing translates the empirical evidence gleaned from research into a set of ideal goals and actionable policies that police departments can implement.

To read Principles click here.

The National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice


Procedural Justice Training for Law Enforcement

The Justice Collaboratory at Yale Law School has played an instrumental role in disseminating research, best practices and training on the use of procedural justice as a tool to improve police trust with the communities they serve. Principles of procedural justice have become standard practice at police departments across the nation as law enforcement agencies seek to increase legitimacy in the eyes of the public.

Members of The Justice Collaboratory, the Center for Policing Equity and the Chicago Police Department’s Education and Training Division developed a three-day procedural justice training module for law enforcement that addresses the theory and implementation of procedural justice as well as the role implicit bias plays in police-community interactions. These three modules were incorporated into the National Initiative on Building Community Trust (NI) and adapted to the unique history and police practices of the six pilot sites: Birmingham, Alabama; Fort Worth, Texas; Gary, Indiana; Minneapolis, Minnesota; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Stockton, California. Each pilot site provided training for its sworn officers though not all officers were trained in each module. Pilot Site interim reports are available through the National Initiative for 2017 (see links below).

 

National Initiative Pilot Sites Training Snapshot

Birmingham, Alabama
Trained all 940 sworn officers in PJ1, PJ2, and PJ3.

Birmingham Officer Perception Survey (PJ1 & PJ2)
NI 2017 Interim Report
NI Liaison: Jerry Wiley, Jerry.Wiley@birminghamal.gov

 

Fort Worth, Texas
Trained all 1650 sworn officers in PJ1, PJ2 and 500 sworn officers in PJ3.

Fort Worth Officer Perception Survey (PJ1)
NI 2017 Interim Report
NI Liaison: Assistant Chief Charlie Ramirez, Charles.Ramirez@fortworthtexas.gov

 

Gary, Indiana
Trained all 237 sworn officers in PJ1, PJ2 and 197 sworn officers in PJ3.

Gary Officer Perception Survey (PJ1)
NI 2017 Interim Report
NI Liaison: Joy Holliday, jholliday@ci.gary.in.us or (219) 881-7497

 

Minneapolis, Minnesota
Trained all 860 sworn officers in PJ1, PJ2 and 857 sworn officers in PJ3.

Minneapolis Officer Perception Survey (PJ1)
NI 2017 Interim Report
NI Liaison: Minneapolis Multi-Strategy Project Site Coordinator Glenn Burt, Glenn.Burt@minneapolismn.gov

 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Trained all 850 sworn officers in PJ1, PJ2 and 500 sworn officers in PJ3.

Pittsburgh Officer Perception Survey (PJ1)
NI 2017 Interim Report
NI Liaison: Commander Eric Holmes, eric.holmes@pittsburghpa.gov; (412) 323-7814

 

Stockton, California
Trained all 400 sworn officers
In PJ1, PJ2 and 115 sworn officers in PJ3.

NI 2017 Interim Report
NI Liaison: Captain Jim Chraska, James.Chraska@stocktonca.gov; (209) 937-8218


Procedural Justice Training modules

Procedural Justice 1 (PJ1): Introduction to procedural justice theory and concepts
Procedural Justice 2 (PJ2): Incorporating procedural justice into police practices
Procedural Justice 3 (PJ3): Implicit bias training for law enforcement
Procedural Justice 3—Community (PJ3 Community): Community-facing implicit bias training

 

Select National Initiative Evaluations and Reports

National Initiative Procedural Justice Resources Page
Model Policies for Procedurally Just Policing,” The Justice Collaboratory at Yale Law School
Research Roundtable Report,” National Initiative for Building Community Trust and Justice
How Do People in High-Crime, Low-Income Communities View the Police?” Urban Institute, pilot sites baseline community perceptions survey

 

Other Research and Reports on Implementing Procedural Justice for Law Enforcement

Training Police for Procedural Justice,” Wes Skogan, et al., Journal of Experimental Criminology
Identity Traps: how to think about race and policing,” Phil Atiba Goff, Behavioral Science and Policy
Review of National Best Practices,” Los Angeles Police Commission
Procedural Justice for Law Enforcement,” Laura Kunard and Charlene Moe

 

Procedural Justice Trainers

The trainers included on this list provide procedural justice training that is germane to the curriculum initially developed by the Justice Collaboratory, the Center for Policing Equity and the Chicago Police Department for the National Initiative.

Al Ferreira 
Police Officer and Trainer
Chicago Police Department
Cell: 708-715-4839
E-mail: cpd022@msn.com

Angel Novalez
Sergeant
Chicago Police Department
Cell: 773-844-2104

Dan Goetz
Police Officer
Chicago Police Department
Cell: 708-932-4741

Mike Chatham
Police Officer
Chicago Police Department
Cell: 773-573-7522

Scott Meadors
Captain
Stockton Police Department
Cell: 209-401-8771
E-mail: Scott.meadors@stocktonca.gov