Francis X. Shen

Florence Rogatz Visiting Professor of Law

(fall term)


Francis X. Shen is a Florence Rogatz Visiting Professor of Law at Yale Law School. He is also Executive Director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Law, Brain, and Behavior, an Instructor in Psychology at Harvard Medical School, and Senior Fellow in Law and Applied Neuroscience at the Petrie-Flom Center at Harvard Law School. At the University of Minnesota, he is Professor of Law, McKnight Presidential Fellow, and faculty member in the Graduate Program on Neuroscience. 

FULL BIOGRAPHY

Contact Information



Faculty Assistant


Pat Florio

Education & Curriculum Vitae


Ph.D., Harvard University, 2008
J.D., Harvard University, 2006
B.A., University of Chicago, 2000

Courses Taught


  • Criminal Law

Francis X. Shen is a Florence Rogatz Visiting Professor of Law at Yale Law School. He is also Executive Director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Law, Brain, and Behavior, an Instructor in Psychology at Harvard Medical School, and Senior Fellow in Law and Applied Neuroscience at the Petrie-Flom Center at Harvard Law School. At the University of Minnesota, he is Professor of Law, McKnight Presidential Fellow, and faculty member in the Graduate Program on Neuroscience. He directs the Shen Neurolaw Lab, whose motto is, “Every story is a brain story.” Born and raised in St. Louis, MO, Shen received his B.A. from the University of Chicago, his J.D. from Harvard Law School, and his Ph.D. from Harvard University. Shen’s research, which utilizes empirical methods and insights from neuroethics, examines how insights from neuroscience can make the legal system more just and effective. He has coauthored three books, including the first Law and Neuroscience casebook (Aspen, with Jones and Schall), with a fourth book currently under review at Oxford Press. His research includes work on the intersection of neuroscience with criminal responsibility and sentencing, evidentiary admissibility, memory and lie detection, cognitive enhancement, trauma and asylum law, sports concussion, juror decision-making, criminal mental states, dementia, and human-animal chimeras. He also teaches and writes on artificial intelligence and the law and is supported by multiple NIH Neuroethics research grants to examine the ethical, legal, and social implications of field-based brain imaging and computational psychiatry.