July 3 Friday

Virtual Cyber Policy Talk: Sonic Privacy

12:00PM to 1:00PM

zoom

This study considers the collection of sonic – sound-related – data and proposes a theory of sonic privacy for data collection. At its foundation, this theory of sonic privacy examines the right of individuals related to their sonic emissions and distinguishes between sounds heard by other individuals and those collected through technological machinations. The next section examines the prior literature and background, providing the foundational thinking on privacy related to sound.

July 10 Friday

Virtual Cyber Policy Talk; The Democratizing Potential of Algorithms?

12:00PM to 1:30PM

Zoom

Jurisdictions are increasingly turning to pretrial risk assessment algorithms as part of a cost-saving and viable solution to the problem of mass pretrial incarceration. Conversations about the use of pretrial algorithms in legal scholarship have tended to focus on their opacity or their (in)ability to reduce high rates of incarceration as well as racial and socioeconomic disparities within the pretrial system. This Article breaks from that tendency, examining these algorithms from a democratization of criminal justice perspective.

July 14 Tuesday

The Role of a Free Press in a Time of Turmoil; A Virtual “Brown Bag Lunch” Discussion

12:00PM to 1:30PM

Zoom

The Abrams Institute for Freedom of Expression and the Media Freedom & Information Access Clinic at Yale Law School invite you, your journalist colleagues and others from your organization to the next in their series of occasional lunchtime discussions of current issues facing journalists and their lawyers.

July 17 Friday

Virtual Cyber Policy Talk: Anticipating and Addressing the Ethical Implications of Deepfakes in the C

12:00PM to 1:00PM

Zoom

New media synthesis technologies are rapidly advancing and becoming more accessible, allowing users to make video and audio clips (i.e. deepfakes) of individuals doing and saying things they never did or said. Deepfakes have significant implications for the integrity of many social domains including that of elections. Focusing on the 2020 US presidential election and using an anticipatory approach, this article examines the ethical issues raised by deepfakes and discusses strategies for addressing these issues.

July 24 Friday

Virtual Cyber Policy Talk: Regulating Algorithmic Amplification: What Does It Mean?

12:00PM to 1:00PM

Zoom

 A common refrain in platform regulation discussions is that platforms may not be responsible for what users say, but they are responsible for their own amplification of harmful content. In response, lawmakers around the world have considered regulating the algorithms that power things like YouTube's recommendations or Facebook's news feed. In this discussion, Daphne Keller will informally discuss and solicit feedback for early stage work assessing what such regulation might look like, whether it could achieve its intended goals, and how the First Amendment factors in. 

July 31 Friday

Virtual Cyber Policy Talk: Applying Anti-Racist Framing to Tech Policy

12:00PM to 1:00PM

Zoom

Courtney D. Cogburn is an Associate Professor of Social Work at Columbia University and is faculty of the Population Research Center and Data Science Institute. She also co-directors the Justice Equity + Tech Laboratory at Columbia. Her research focuses on the characterization and measurement of racism, the role of racism in producing racial inequities in health and applying a transdisciplinary approach to the development and application of emerging technologies to map and address complex social ecologies that intersect with race and racism. In this talk, Dr.

August 7 Friday

Virtual Cyber Policy Talk: Privatizing Federalism in Health Data Regulation

12:00PM to 1:00PM

Zoom

In the last decade, since the passage of the Affordable Care Act, debates regarding access to health care and relatedly, of federalism, have focused on who sets the rules for healthcare payment. Numerous articles have been written about the ACA, about Medicaid programs, and about future directions in universal healthcare coverage.  But money is not the only currency that access to health requires. A medical professional cannot treat a patient without health data. And the legal literature has not fully engaged with the question of who sets the rules for healthcare data exchange.

August 14 Friday

Virtual Cyber Policy Talk:The Reasonable Robot: Artificial Intelligence and the Law

12:00PM to 1:00PM

Zoom

AI and people do not compete on a level-playing field. Self-driving vehicles may be safer than human drivers, but laws often penalize such technology. People may provide superior customer service, but businesses are automating to reduce their taxes. AI may innovate more effectively, but an antiquated legal framework constrains inventive AI. In The Reasonable Robot, Ryan Abbott argues that the law should not discriminate between AI and human behavior and proposes a new legal principle that will ultimately improve human well-being.

August 21 Friday

Virtual Cyber Policy: Digital Age Samaritans

12:00PM to 1:00PM

Zoom

Modern technology enables crimes to be documented and viewed contemporaneously or soon after. This technology creates jurisdictional and authenticity challenges but also opportunities for individuals who are not even physically present to become aware of emergencies and to provide assistance.

September 1 Tuesday

Competition Is Killing Us: From pro-competition to anti-monopoly; Michelle Meagher

12:00PM to 1:30PM

Zoom

In her book Competition is Killing Us: How Big Business Harms Our Society and Planet - and What to do About it, Michelle Meagher seeks to answer the elusive question at the heart of many of the most important economic debates of our times: why does corporate capitalism concentrate wealth and power in so few hands, but spread its harms so widely?

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