Non-Academic Requirements

Students in the Multidisciplinary Academic Program in Human Rights are expected to attend weekly dinners in their sophomore spring and junior fall, unless they have a conflict with a prior and inflexible commitment. In their sophomore spring, students are required to attend three events sponsored by the Schell Center and write short reflections on these events, to be submitted by the end of the semester. In the rest of their time in the Program, students are required to write and submit one event reflection each semester. Juniors and seniors should send their event reflection to madeline.batt@yale.edu no later than two weeks after the event took place. With students’ permission, some of these reflections or excerpts from them will be posted on the Human Rights Program website.

More information about weekly dinners and other non-academic aspects of the Human Rights Program can be found under the Student Life tab.

Academic Requirements

There are six required courses in the Multidisciplinary Academic Program in Human Rights: a gateway lecture course, four electives, and a senior colloquium. In their senior year, Scholars complete a capstone project informed by their coursework, extracurricular activities, and summer internships or research.

Gateway Course

HMRT 100/PLSC 148 “Human Rights Theory and Politics,” offered each spring, introduces students to the core ideas, issues, practices, and controversies regarding human rights. In doing so, its objective is to map the complex terrain that human rights and their study occupy, rather than (merely) to justify the concept’s existence.

Human Rights Scholars are required to take the course in spring of their sophomore year, unless they are studying abroad or receive permission from the Program Director for other extenuating circumstances.

Capstone Project

Each Human Rights Scholar will undertake a capstone project in the fall of senior year, to be informed by the student’s extracurricular experience and developed in consultation with the Program Director. In order to complete the project, scholars will enroll in a weekly seminar (HMRT 400, ‘Advanced Human Rights Colloquium’) in which they will receive guidance from the Program Director, share progress reports, and provide each other with feedback. 

Please note that University policy requires that all student research projects involving human subjects be reviewed by an institutional review board (IRB) prior to the start of the study, to ensure that the project meets University requirements and any applicable regulations.

Anthony Kayruz (’17) presents excerpts from the screenplay he wrote for his capstone project, which told the story of a Central American unaccompanied minor and his immigration lawyers.

Elective Courses

Each Human Rights Scholar is required to take four electives, drawn from existing Yale courses. Each Scholar’s elective courses should reflect the interdisciplinary nature of human rights study, including a diversity of perspectives and methodologies across departments and disciplines. For example, Scholars are encouraged to select courses that explore different geographic or thematic areas and that introduce them to both theoretical and practical concerns. Our formal criterion for a Program elective is that a course “engage with the language, ideas, and methods of human rights.” We ask that you distinguish this from courses that address issues that affect people’s human rights, would be susceptible to a human rights analysis, or would simply be useful for understanding a human rights issue in which you are interested. Rather, with the Program’s goal of enabling a coherent study of human rights and with only four electives required, we expect your electives to focus on courses that will engage directly with and enhance your knowledge of and facility with the concepts, institutions, and development of human rights discourse.

Scholars will be required to have their electives approved by the Program Director and will also have the opportunity to petition for additional courses in Yale College or for graduate courses to count as electives. Please note that only courses taken following the student’s admission to the Program will satisfy the elective requirement.

Scholars complete the Program's requirements in addition to the coursework for their majors and may count a maximum of two courses as electives that also count toward their major requirements. Although Scholars may double major, we do not encourage it, and Scholars who double major may count only a total of two courses that fulfill their major requirements as Program electives.

A list of the elective courses for fall 2020 and spring 2021 is listed below:

AFAM 115/WGSS 125 – “We Interrupt this Program”: The Multidimensional Histories of Queer and Trans Politics
Roderick Ferguson
TTh 11:35a-12:50p
Fall 2020

In 1991, the arts organizations Visual AIDS and The Kitchen collaborated with video artist and filmmaker Charles Atlas to produce the live television broadcast "We Interrupt this Program." Part educational presentation, part performance piece, the show was aired in millions of homes across the nation. The program, in The Kitchen’s words, “sought to feature voices that had often been marginalized within many discussions of AIDS, in particular people of color and women.” This course builds upon and is inspired by this aspect of Atlas's visionary presentation, an aspect that used the show to produce a critically multicultural platform that could activate cultural histories and critical traditions from various communities. In effect, the course uses this aspect as a metonym for the racial, gender, sexual, and class heterogeneity of queer art and organizing. It conducts its investigation by looking at a variety of primary materials that illustrate the heterogeneous makeup of queer and trans politics. The course also draws on more recent texts and visual works that arose from the earlier contexts that the primary texts helped to illuminate and shape. 

AFAM 125/AMST 125/EDST 130/HIST 136 – The Long Civil Rights Movement
Crystal Feimster
MW 11:35a-12:25p
Fall 2020

Political, social, and artistic aspects of the U.S. civil rights movement from the 1920s through the 1980s explored in the context of other organized efforts for social change. Focus on relations between the African American freedom movement and debates about gender, labor, sexuality, and foreign policy. Changing representations of social movements in twentieth-century American culture; the politics of historical analysis.

AFAM 220/FILM 434 – Archive Aesthetics and Community Storytelling
Thomas Harris
M 3:30-6:20p
Spring 2021

This production course explores strategies of archive aesthetics and community storytelling in film and media. It allows students to create projects that draw from archives—including news sources, personal narratives, and found archives—to produce collaborative community storytelling. Conducted as a production workshop, the course explores the use of archives in constructing real and fictive narratives across a variety of disciplines, such as—participants create and develop autobiographies, biographies, or fiction-based projects, tailored to their own work in film/new media around Natalie Goldberg’s concept that “our lives are at once ordinary and mythical.”

AFAM 227/AMST 227/ER&M 349/ HIST 137J – From the Voting Rights Act to #blacklivesmatter
Staff
W 9:25-11:15a
Fall 2020

This course explores the period beginning from 1964 through the emergence of the #blacklivesmatter movement in 2013. Key concepts covered in this course include the Black Panther Party and rise of the Black Power movement; political campaigns of Shirley Chisholm, Jesse Jackson, and Barack Obama. The seminar concludes with an examination of the #blacklivesmatter movement and broader efforts addressing mass incarceration, poverty, and opportunity gaps in education.

AFAM 239/AMST 461/EDST 209/ER&M 292/WGSS 202 – Identity, Diversity, and Policy in U.S. Education
Andrew Dowe, Craig Canfield
MW 6-7:15p
Fall 2020

Introduction to critical theory (feminism, queer theory, critical race theory, disability studies, trans studies, indigenous studies) as a fundamental tool for understanding and critiquing identity, diversity, and policy in U.S. education. Exploration of identity politics and theory, as they figure in education policy. Methods for applying theory and interventions to interrogate issues in education. Application of theory and interventions to policy creation and reform.

AFAM 259/AMST 309/EDST 255 – Education and Empire
Talya Zemach-Bersin
W 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

This course offers an introduction to the transnational history of education in relation to the historical development of the U.S. empire both at home and abroad. By bringing together topics often approached separately—immigration, education, race, colonialism, and the history of U.S. empire—we interrogate the ways that education has been mobilized to deploy power: controlling knowledge, categorizing and policing differences, administering unequal paths to citizenship/belonging, forcing assimilation, promoting socio-economic divides, and asserting discipline and control.

AFAM 287/AFST 412/AMST 465/FREN 412/LITR 250 – Postcolonial Theory and Literature
Fadila Habchi
T 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

A survey of the principal modes of thought that have animated decolonization and life after colonialism, as seen in both theoretical and literary texts. Concentration on the British and French imperial and postcolonial contexts. Readings in negritude, orientalism, psychoanalysis, poststructuralism, and novels.

AFAM 306/HIST 175J – Movements for Black Freedom in the Nineteenth-Century Americas

Bianca Dang
T 3:30-5:20p
Fall 2020

This seminar examines Black freedom in the Americas both as a lived experience and as an idea that moved throughout the region during the long nineteenth century. This course explores the hemispheric impacts and reverberations of multiple, yet connected, movements for Black freedom in the nineteenth-century Americas. It begins with the Haitian Revolution, a revolution enacted and won by enslaved African and Afro-descended people that fundamentally transformed the hemisphere. It concludes with Black people's resistance to Jim Crow policies in the post-American Civil War era, emphasizing the enduring strength of Black freedom movements. Organized in a series of themes, such as the Law, the Environment, and Indigeneity and Blackness, this seminar highlights the transnational dimensions of movements for Black freedom in the nineteenth century. At the same time, it traces the distinctiveness of each of these movements to provide a broad, yet nuanced, account of the hemispheric and global dynamics of slavery, freedom, race, and gender from the Age of Revolutions to the turn of the twentieth century.

AFAM 315/WGSS 305 – Black Feminist Theory

Roderick Ferguson
W 3:30-5:20p
Fall 2020

This course is designed to introduce you to some of the major themes in black feminist theory. The course does so by presenting classic texts with more recent ones to give you a sense of the vibrancy of black feminist theory for addressing past and present concerns. Rather than interpret black feminist theory as a critical formation that simply puts race, gender, sexuality, and class into conversation with one another, the course apprehends that formation as one that produced epistemic shifts in how we understand politics, empire, history, the law, and literature. This is by no means an exhaustive list of the areas into which black feminism intervened. It is merely a sample of some of the most vibrant ideological and discursive contexts in which black feminism caused certain epistemic transformations. 

AFAM 410 – Interdisciplinary Approaches to African American Studies
Crystal Feimster
W 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

An interdisciplinary, thematic approach to the study of race, nation, and ethnicity in the African diaspora. Topics include class, gender, color, and sexuality; the dynamics of reform, Pan-Africanism, neocolonialism, and contemporary black nationalism. Use of a broad range of methodologies.

AFAM 451/ANTH 445/THST 450/WGSS 442 – Black Women Moving and the Ethnography of Embodiment
Aimee Cox
HTBA
Spring 2021

In this course we explore the theory and methods employed by Black women ethnographers, artists, and activists invested in transforming the traditional norms of the academic disciplines and creative contexts in which they operate. These boundary erasing, rule breaking women challenge us to think expansively and act courageously in our efforts to not only dream a new world but bring that world into fruition. The life and work of anthropologist/dancer/choreographer/activist Katherine Dunham (1909–2006) provides the framework through which we think through the strategies contemporary scholar-artists employ in their social justice practices, while the concept of movement is our theoretical and methodological foundation for engaging with the work of historical and contemporary Black women change agents. We ask how movement functions in the work of Dunham and these contemporary scholar-artists in terms of: the moving and/or dancing body; movement and migration across geographic territories and imagined space; and participation in social movements. Inspired by the techniques these women have developed for re-imagining the possibilities for moving as an act of social change, we experiment with creating our own embodied artistic practices and research methods. Students should anticipate a holistic experience that requires an openness to physical activity and choreography (accessible to all) as one of our primary tools for both analyzing the multi-media course texts, as well as constructing our own boundary crossing projects.

AFST 135/PLSC 135 – Media and Conflict
Staff
HTBA
Spring 2021

The theory and practice of reporting on international conflict and war, and its relation to political discourse in the United States and abroad. Materials include case studies of media coverage of war in Europe, Africa, and the Middle East.

AFST 175/PLSC 175 – Africa in International Relations
David Simon
TTh 11:35a-12:50p
Fall 2020

This courses examines key facets of how African countries interact with the rest of the world, and with other countries on the continent. Focusing mostly on Sub-Saharan African countries, it looks at international economic relations (focusing on aid but also addressing trade, investment, and debt); peacemaking and peacebuilding; and regional governance institutions.

AFST 304/MMES 304/PLSC 458 – Modern North Africa in Flux
Vish Sakthivel
W 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

Study of the politics of modern North Africa (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and to a limited degree, Libya and Mauritania), including colonialism; state-formation and early nationalism; the cultivation of authoritarian regimes; modern authoritarian politics; civil-military relations; democratization; civil society; protest, dissent, social and movement mobilization; oil and rentierism; Islamism and the politics of religion; linkages to the Mashreq; and the dynamics of foreign intervention. Readings and approach to politics are cross-disciplinary, integrating political science, anthropological, historical, religious, as well as gender/race studies

Prerequisite: MMES 191 or permission of the instructor.

AFST 396/HIST 396J – Revolutions and Socialist Experiments in Africa
Benedito Machava
Tuesday 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

This seminar explores the contours of Africa’s embrace and engagement with the most influential ideology of the twentieth-century. Why, and through which channels, were Africans attracted to socialism? Did particular forms of colonialism and decolonization push African political actors towards revolution and socialist experiments? Is it legitimate, as some scholars have suggested, to speak of genuinely African socialisms? If so, what was the nature of these socialisms and how did they differ from the versions of socialism around the world? What political, social, economic, and cultural ends did socialism serve in Africa? And what were the consequences and legacies of African socialist experiments? The seminar addresses these questions. Our goal is to place Africa in the mainstream of conversations about socialism. We begin with the assumption that, like any doctrine, socialism was the object of multiple interpretations, modification, and appropriation from its inception. In so doing, we challenge orthodox understandings of socialism, which hold the European versions as the pure models and the rest as diluted if not populist façades of the ‘true’ doctrine. We begin with theoretical readings that help us situate the major debates about socialism in general and socialism in Africa. We then proceed to examine the overall historical context in which African nationalists adopted socialism. We differentiate the first branch of “African Socialism” from the second wave of “Afro-Marxism.” We also pay close attention to issues of decolonization and political imagination; ideas and experiments of development; gender, morality, and social engineering.

AFST 486/HIST 374J/HSHM 486 – African Systems of Thought
Nana Osei Quarshie
T 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

This seminar explores the effects of colonialism and post-colonial power relations on the production of scientific, medical, and embodied knowledge about Africa. The course focuses on three broad themes covered across four units. First, we read debates over the nature and definition of science and tradition. How have colonialism and post-colonial power relations defined the tasks of an African science? What does it mean to decolonize African thought or culture? Second, we examine the nature of rationality. Is reason singular or plural? Culturally-bound or universal? To what extent are witchcraft, African healing practices, and ancestor veneration rational practices? Is there a “traditional” rationality? Third, we explore the relationship between scientific representations, social practices, and local culture. What relationship exists between social practices and culturally shared categories of knowledge? Lastly, we examine the intersection of capital and medical expertise. How have shifting conceptions of value and capital, reshaped scientific and medical authority in Africa?

AMST 204 – Protest Music & the Black Radical Tradition

Daphne Brooks
MW 4:00-5:15p
Fall 2020

This interdisciplinary lecture course charts the evolution of protest music in America as it was originally designed and bravely imagined and deployed by captive peoples of African descent through our present day. The course will emphasize an examination of black radical aesthetics in sound alongside key literary and performance texts that dialectically resonate with the resistant musical innovations of a range of black culture workers from the antebellum era through our current 2020 moment of peril and possibility. The course explores the history, politics, and cultures of U.S. protest music across three centuries as it was radically shaped by dispossessed peoples who invented their own world-making sonic lexicon in a bid to transform the nation as well as their own very conditions of being. Throughout the semester, we’ll explore, among other things, uniquely subversive vocal strategies, lyrical tropes, and instrumental disturbances that generate social justice critical commentary, philosophies and racial, gender, class, sexual identity, and human rights politics. The course will likewise examine key works of African American literature that explore the radical dimensions of black music in the context of captivity (slave narratives, oratory, sacred radical music), the post-Reconstruction era (classic essays, political tracts and fiction), the Jim Crow era (Harlem Renaissance poetry and theater, the experimental novel), the long Civil Rights and Black Power movements (spoken word, drama, oratory) as well as the landmark protest movements emerging across the 20th and 21st centuries led by black feminist, anti-war, and queer liberation agitators. We’ll round out the term by turning our attention in full to the music, literature, and performances of the Black Lives Matter movement. This course will draw on secondary scholarship in black radical tradition theory, history, sound studies, performance studies, women, gender and sexuality studies, queer theory, critical theory, visual culture studies, and American Studies.

AMST 209/PLSC 262/ER&M 223 Race, Politics, and the Law
Daniel HoSang
TTh 1-2:15p
Spring 2021

Examination of how race—as a mode of domination and resistance—has developed and transformed in the United States since the early-twentieth-century. How political actors and social movements engage the law to shape visions of freedom, democracy, and political life. Consideration of critical race theory, political discourse analysis, intersectionality and women of color feminism, and American political development.

AMST 235/ENGL 354 – Language, Disability, Fiction
Jim Berger
Th 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

Portrayals of cognitive and linguistic impairment in modern fiction. Characters with limited capacities for language as figures of "otherness." Contemporaneous discourses of science, sociology, ethics, politics, and aesthetics. The ethics of speaking about or for subjects at the margins of discourse.

AMST 314/ER&M 314/WGSS 306 – Gender and Transgender
Greta LaFleur
TTh 11:35-12:50p
Spring 2021

Introduction to transgender studies, an emergent field that draws on gender studies, queer theory, sociology, feminist science studies, literary studies, and history. Representations of gender nonconformity in a cultural context dominated by a two-sex model of human gender differentiation. Sources include novels, autobiographies, films, and philosophy and criticism.

AMST 317/ER&M 353/HIST 323J – Race, Radicalism, and Migration in Latinx History
Stephen Pitti
TTh 4:00-5:15p
Fall 2020

Histories of Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Central American, Dominican, and Cuban American communities in the United States, with a focus on transnational and labor politics, cultural expression, print culture, and social movements. Readings and films locate Latinx experiences alongside African American and Asian American histories, and within broader patterns of U.S. and Latin American history.

AMST 318/HIST 415J – The Problem of Global Poverty
Joanne Meyerowitz
T 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

Study of the programs and policies that aimed to end global poverty from 1960 to the present, from modernization to microcredit to universal basic income. Topics include the green revolution, population control, the "women in development" movement, and the New International Economic Order. Extensive work with primary sources.

May count toward geographical distributional credit within the History major for any region studied, upon application to the director of undergraduate studies.

AMST 348/ER&M 381/EVST 304 – Space, Place, and Landscape
Laura Barraclough
W 3:30-5:20p
Fall 2020

Survey of core concepts in cultural geography and spatial theory. Ways in which the organization, use, and representation of physical spaces produce power dynamics related to colonialism, race, gender, class, and migrant status. Multiple meanings of home; the politics of place names; effects of tourism; the aesthetics and politics of map making; spatial strategies of conquest. Includes field projects in New Haven.

AMST 358/ENGL 281 – Animals in Modern American Fiction
Jim Berger
W 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

Literary portrayals of animals are used to examine the relations between literature, science, and social and political thought since the late nineteenth century. Topics include Darwinist thought, socialism, fascism, gender and race relations, new thinking about ecology, and issues in neuroscience.

AMST 398/ER&M 308/HIST 158J – American Indian Law and Policy

Ned Blackhawk
TTh 9:00-10:15a
Spring 2021

Survey of the origins, history, and legacies of federal Indian law and policy during two hundred years of United States history. The evolution of U.S. constitutional law and political achievements of American Indian communities over the past four decades.

AMST 436/ER&M 440 Antiracism, Racial Justice, and Freedom
Daniel HoSang
M 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

Examination of competing conceptualizations of anti-racism and racial justice within a range of historical, theoretical, and practical sites. Consideration of how the resurgence of collective and popular mobilizations against racial and colonial domination in the last ten years, witnessed in the struggles against the police and prison violence, immigrant detention and deportation, and indigenous-led campaigns against fossil fuel extraction, raise profound questions about the meaning, politics, and vision of racial justice.

AMST 439/ER&M 439 – Fruits of Empire
Gary Okihiro
W 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

Readings, discussions, and research on imperialism and "green gold" and their consequences for the imperial powers and their colonies and neo-colonies. Spatially conceived as a world-system that enmeshes the planet and as earth's latitudes that divide the temperate from the tropical zones, imperialism as discourse and material relations is this seminar's focus together with its implantations—an empire of plants. Vast plantations of sugar, cotton, tea, coffee, bananas, and pineapples occupy land cultivated by native and migrant workers, and their fruits move from the tropical to the temperate zones, impoverishing the periphery while profiting the core. Fruits of Empire, thus, implicates power and the social formation of race, gender, sexuality, class, and nation.

AMST 452/ER&M 452 – Movement, Memory, and U.S. Settler Colonialism
Laura Barraclough
W 9:25-11:15a
Spring 2021

This research seminar examines and theorizes the significance of movement and mobility in the production and contestation of settler colonial nation-states. To do so, it brings together the fields of settler colonial studies, critical indigenous studies, ethnic studies, public history, and mobility studies. After acquainting ourselves with the foundations and some of the key debates within each of these fields, we examine four case studies: The Freedom Trail and the Black Heritage Trail in Boston; the Lewis and Clark expedition and its recuperation as a site of healing and education for tribal nations in the Upper Midwest and Northwest; the Trail of Tears and the contest over southern memory; and the relationships between settlement, labor migration, and regional racial formation in California. Students then conduct their own research projects that integrate primary source research on a particular organized movement (of people, non-human animals, ideas, practices) with two or more expressions of memory about that movement (in the form of public history installations, popular culture, literature, music, digital memes, etc.).

This course is best suited to students who have initial ideas about a potential research topic and are exploring related ideas for their senior essay.

AMST 458/AMST 629/WGSS 612 – Racial and Economic Justice in Transgender Health
Greta LaFleur, Ronica Mukerjee
Th 1:30-3:20
Spring 2021

What kind of access and exposure do transgender people have to healthcare services, policing, mental health, education, and public spaces and what kind of access should trans people have? How do we work to close the gap between what is available, and what should be? This course considers the diverse range of healthcare and other basic needs of transgender and nonbinary people in a number of different institutional settings and medical contexts—prisons to K-12 public schools, gender-affirming surgeries to fertility support—with a twinned focus on how institutions render trans people and their bodies illegible or even illegal, on the one hand, and what kind of knowledge, best practices, and interventions might be implemented to remove obstacles for trans and nonbinary people seeking the care that they need, on the other. At the heart of the course is the role of racial and economic justice—in healthcare, and in the world more broadly—in mitigating the health and healthcare disparities between transgender and non-transgender patients. This course is co-taught by Greta LaFleur (American Studies) and Ronica Mukerjee (School of Nursing). Course will be capped at 25.

AMST 479/ER&M 402 – The Displaced: Migrant & Refugee Narratives of the 20th and 21st Centuries
Leah Mirakhor
W 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

This course examines a series of transnational literary texts and films that illuminate how the displaced—migrants, exiles, and refugees— remake home away from their native countries. The twentieth and twenty-first centuries have produced massive displacements due to wars, genocides, racial, ethnic and religious conflicts, economic and climate change, among other factors. Our course focuses on several texts that explore questions of home, nation, and self in the context of specific historical events such as the Holocaust, civil rights movements in the U.S., internment, the Indian partition, African decolonization, and Middle Eastern/Arab ethno-religious conflicts and wars. We examine these events alongside the shifting legal and political policies and categories related to asylum, humanitarian parole, refugee, and illegal alien status. Exploring themes such as nostalgia, longing, trauma, and memory, we look at the possibilities and limitations of creating, contesting, and imagining home in the diaspora. Our objective is to debate and develop the ethical, political, geographic, and imaginative articulations of home in an era of mass displacements and geo-political crises. We examine how notions of home are imagined alongside and against categories of race, gender, and sexuality.

AMST 486/ER&M 425 – Asian American Studies of Race, Colonialism, and Empire
Lisa Lowe
MW 2:30-3:45pm
Spring 2021

This interdisciplinary course examines three periods of Asian American history that are paradigmatic within Asian American Studies of race, colonialism, and empire: 19th century Chinese immigrant labor, the internment of Japanese and Japanese Americans during World War II, and Korean Americans in 1992 Los Angeles. Studying these three examples in their national and global contexts, we consider Chinese immigrant railroad workers in relation to both conditions for emigration from China, and to Native American responses to U.S. settlement and expansion into the western frontier; the dispossession and incarceration of Japanese Americans in relation to wartime racialization of Mexican Americans, Blacks, and the longer history of U.S. war in Asia; and finally, we seek to understand the positioning of Korean Americans as "middlemen" in post-Civil Rights multiracial Los Angeles in relation to Korean War, and U.S. development and investment in the industrialization of South Korea. We explore how Asian American histories of racialized labor and citizenship in the U.S. are better understood in comparative relation to the histories of other groups, and with consideration of the longer histories of U.S. interventions in Asian countries of origin.

ANTH 119 – Law as Culture
Louisa Lombard
MW 9:00-10:15a
Fall 2020

Introduction to anthropological understanding of what law is, how it holds its authority, and how it is shaped by cultural assumptions about justice, rights, and morality. Readings from classic and contemporary texts in legal and political anthropology. Cultural dimensions of law and its changing relationship to discipline, power, and governance.

ANTH 140/ER&M 241/SOCY 138 – The Corporation
Douglas Rogers
MW 11:35a-12:25p
Fall 2020

Survey of the rise, diversity, and power of the capitalist corporation in global contexts, with a focus on the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics include: the corporation as legal entity and the social and cultural consequences of this status; corporations in the colonial era; relationships among corporations, states, and non-governmental organizations in Western and non-Western contexts; anti-corporate critique and response; corporate social responsibility; and race, gender, and indigeneity.

ANTH 244 – Social Change in Contemporary Southeast Asia
Erik Harms
TTh 9:00-10:15a
Fall 2020

This course examines a number of significant forms of social change occurring in Southeast Asia in recent years. Fueled by new digital technologies; environmental change; globalized economies, politics, human rights, and religion—Southeast Asia is experiencing a rapid transformation. Some of these changes are visible such as the ubiquitous use of mobile phones, transformed city skylines, rampant deforestation, and changing infrastructure. However, some are less visible such as the forced evacuations of the poor from urban centers, increasing state surveillance, and new forms of relationships between people and places enabled through digital communications. Topics include migration, politics and political activism, urban development, environmentalism, labor, violence, religion, popular culture, gender, and relationships. Principle readings include key works from a range of disciplines and represent a number of Southeast Asian nations. The course includes a visual component through a number of in class film screenings.

ANTH 322/EVST 324/SAST 306 – Environmental Justice in South Asia
Kalyanakrishnan Sivaramakrishnan
M 3:30-5:20p
Fall 2020

Study of South Asia’s nation building and economic development in the aftermath of war and decolonization in the 20th century. How it generated unprecedented stress on natural environments; increased social disparity; and exposure of the poor and minorities to environmental risks and loss of homes, livelihoods, and cultural resources. Discussion of the rise of environmental justice movements and policies in the region as the world comes to grips with living in the Anthropocene.

ANTH 324/ANTH 384 – Politics of Memory
Yukiko Koga
W 9:25-11:15a
Fall 2020

This course explores the role of memory as a social, cultural, and political force in contemporary society. How societies remember difficult pasts has become a contested site for negotiating the present. Through the lens of memory, we examine complex roles that our relationships to difficult pasts play in navigating issues we face today. This course explores this politics of memory that takes place in the realm of popular culture and public space. The class asks such questions as: How do you represent difficult and contested pasts? What does it mean to enable long-silenced victims’ voices to be heard? What are the consequences of re-narrating the past by highlighting past injuries and trauma? Does memory work heal or open wounds of a society and a nation? Through examples drawn from the Holocaust, the atomic bombing in Hiroshima, the Vietnam War, genocide in Indonesia and massacres in Lebanon, to debates on confederacy statues, slavery, and lynching in the US, this course approaches these questions through an anthropological exploration of concepts such as memory, trauma, mourning, silence, voice, testimony, and victimhood.

ANTH 381/WGSS 378 – Sex and Global Politics
Staff
HTBA
Spring 2021

Global perspectives on the sexual politics of gender identity, sexual orientation, and human rights. Examination of historical, cultural, and political aspects of sexual orientation and gender identity in the context of globalization.

ANTH 386/GLBL 393 – Humanitarian Interventions: Ethics, Politics, and Health
Catherine Panter-Brick
W 1:30-2:20p
Fall 2020

Analysis of humanitarian interventions from a variety of social science disciplinary perspectives. Issues related to policy, legal protection, health care, morality, and governance in relation to the moral imperative to save lives in conditions of extreme adversity. Promotion of dialogue between social scientists and humanitarian practitioners.

ANTH 439 – Africa, Politics, and Anthropology
Louisa Lombard
W 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

Historical-anthropological study of politics in Africa since the early nineteenth century. The creation and operation of African states; the negotiation of legitimacy, authority, and belonging by state agents and the people they govern; anthropological theories about the workings of African politics, including the involvement of both state and nonstate actors.

ANTH 441/MMES 399/MMES 430/WGSS 430 – Gender and Citizenship in the Middle East
Eda Pepi
W 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

Examination of the gendered and sexual dimensions of war, conflict, and partition, and the codification of modern citizenship in the Middle East—from Syria, to the Middle East conflict, to Western Sahara, among others—this course presents ethnographic, historical, and literary scholarship that theorizes the role of kinship and citizenship in narratives of the nation and sovereignty.

ANTH 451/ANTH 651/WGSS 431/WGSS 651 – Intersectionality and Women’s Health
Marcia Inhorn
Th 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

The intersections of race, class, gender, and other axes of “difference” and their effects on women’s health, primarily in the contemporary United States. Recent feminist approaches to intersectionality and multiplicity of oppressions theory. Ways in which anthropologists studying women’s health issues have contributed to social and feminist theory at the intersections of race, class, and gender.

ECON 465/EP&E 224/GLBL 330 – Debating Globalization
Ernesto Zedillo
M 9:25-11:15a
Spring 2021

Facets of contemporary economic globalization, including trade, investment, and migration. Challenges and threats of globalization: inclusion and inequality, emerging global players, global governance, climate change, and nuclear weapons proliferation.

Prerequisite: background in international economics and data analysis. Preference to seniors majoring in Economics or EP&E.

ECON 468 – Institutions and Incentives in Economic Development
Mark Rosenzweig
W 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

Assessment of alternative policies and programs designed to promote economic development; examination of fundamental problems of underdeveloped areas and consideration of how and whether such programs resolve them. The roles of indigenous institutions in low-income countries in alleviating problems of underdevelopment.

Prerequisites: intermediate microeconomics and econometrics.

EDST 144/SOCY 144/ER&M 211/EVST 144 – Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration

Grace Kao
MW 2:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

Exploration of sociological studies and theoretical and empirical analyses of race, ethnicity, and immigration, with focus on race relations and racial and ethnic differences in outcomes in contemporary U.S. society (post-1960s). Study of the patterns of educational and labor market outcomes, incarceration, and family formation of whites, blacks (African Americans), Hispanics, and Asian Americans in the United States, as well as immigration patterns and how they affect race and ethnic relations.

ENGL 189 – Literature and Social Justice
Joseph North
TTh 9:25-10:15a
Fall 2020

This lecture course introduces students to a range of thinking about the relationship between literature and projects of social justice within political modernity. We read works by a wide range of literary and political thinkers from the last two-and-a-half centuries or so, reflecting especially on questions such as: What is the relationship between literature and politics? How does social change play out in literature, and, in turn, what role might literature play in social change? Where does the category of the ‘literary’ come from, and how does it relate to key political categories such as ‘the people’? How might literature—and the arts generally—be of use to us in our attempts to create a more just, free, and equal society? How might a more just, free, and equal society allow us to relate to literature and the arts? On the literary side, our writers may include William Wordsworth, Jane Austen, W.B. Yeats, Virginia Woolf, Federico Garcia Lorca, Pablo Neruda, Czeslaw Milosz, Wislawa Szymborska, Audre Lorde, Seamus Heaney, Milan Kundera.  On the political side, our thinkers may include Edmund Burke, Mary Wollstonecraft, J.S. Mill, Karl Marx, Karl Popper, Immanuel Wallerstein.

ENGL 194/WGSS 194 – Queer Modernisms
Jill Richards
TTh 10:30-11:20a
Spring 2021

Study of modernist literature and the historical formation of homosexual identity from the late nineteenth through mid-twentieth centuries. Topics include: sexology as a medical and disciplinary practice; decadence and theories of degeneration; the criminalization of homosexuality in the Wilde and Pemberton-Billing trials; cross-dressing and drag balls in Harlem; transsexuality and sex-reassignment surgery; lesbian periodical cultures; nightlife and cruising; gay Berlin and the rise of fascism; colonial narratives of same-sex desire in Arabia and the South Pacific; Caribbean sexual morality; and the salon cultures of expatriate Paris.

ENGL 291/WGSS 340 – Feminist and Queer Theory
Staff
T 9:25-11:15a
Fall 2020

Historical survey of feminist and queer theory from the Enlightenment to the present, with readings from key British, French, and American works. Focus on the foundations and development of contemporary theory. Shared intellectual origins and concepts, as well as divergences and conflicts, among different ways of approaching gender and sexuality.

EVST 212/EP&E 390/PLSC 212 – Democracy & Sustainability
Michael Fotos
Th 9:25-11:15a
Fall 2020

Democracy, liberty, and the sustainable use of natural resources. Concepts include institutional analysis, democratic consent, property rights, market failure, and common pool resources. Topics of policy substance are related to human use of the environment and to U.S. and global political institutions.

EVST 255/F&ES 255/GLBL 282/PLSC 215 – Environmental Law and Politics: Global Food Challenges
John Wargo
M 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

We explore relations among food, environment, health, and law. We consider global-scale avoidable challenges such as: starvation and malnutrition, obesity, other food related human diseases, climate instability, soil loss, water depletion and contamination, microbial hazards, chemical contamination, food waste, dietary convergence, air pollution, energy, packaging, culinary globalization, and biodiversity loss. We focus on laws that influence the world’s food system, including those intended to reduce or prevent environmental and health damages. Other laws protect rights of secrecy, property, speech, confidential business information, free trade, worker protection, equal opportunity, and freedom from discrimination. Ethical concerns of justice, equity, and transparency are prominent themes. Examples of effective law, consumer movements and corporate innovations provide optimism for the future of responsible food.

EVST 299 – Sustainable Development Goals and Implementation
Gordon Geballe
HTBA
Spring 2021

Students develop an understanding of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and focus on how to manage projects that implement the SDGs. Students develop an understanding of the global sustainability agenda, studying each SDG in detail. Students explore and acquire practical project management skills. The course also taps into the expertise and experience of professors and staff from various disciplines and schools, as well as practitioners directly from the field.

EVST 305/GLBL 301/GLBL 505/MMES 305 – Environmental Security in the Middle East
Kaveh Madani
W 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

This course overviews how environmental, water, food, energy, and climate change have increasingly become linked to human and national security in the Middle East. It begins by exploring the state of the environment in the region and how the policies of the Middle East governments have lead to serious environmental degradation and subsequent loss of jobs, migration, social tension, violence, and regional conflicts. Drawing on an in-depth analysis of contemporary case/country studies, students learn how these problems can serve as major human and national security threats.

This interdisciplinary course is of interest to students with background/interest in environmental science/engineering, ecology, geography, geosciences, social/political sciences, public policy, security and peace building, international relations, diplomacy, and global affairs.

EP&E 243/GLBL 336/PLSC 423/LAST 423 – Political Economy of Poverty Alleviation

Ana De La O

Overview of classic and contemporary approaches to the question of why some countries have done better than others at reducing poverty. Emphasis on the role of politics.

EP&E 244/ECON 449/PLSC 374 – The Economic Analysis of Conflict
Gerard Padro
Th 9:25-11:15a
Spring 2021

Introduction to the microeconomic analysis of internal conflict. In particular, how conflict imposes economic costs on the population and how people react to conflict. Topics include the correlates of war; the economic legacies of conflict on human capital, local institutions, households’ income, and firm performance; and the causes and impacts of forced displacement.

Prerequisites: Intermediate microeconomics and econometrics.

EP&E 312/PLSC 297 – Moral Choices in Politics
Boris Kasputin
T 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

A study of how and why people make costly moral choices in politics. Figures studied include Thomas More, Abraham Lincoln, Nelson Mandela, Václav Havel, and Aung San Suu Kyi.

EP&E 353/PLSC 305 Critique of Political Violence
Boris Kasputin
T 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

Methods of conceptualizing political violence that are prevalent in contemporary political philosophical discourse. Use of theoretical-analytical tools to examine the modes violence assumes and the functions it performs in modern political life as well as the meanings and possibilities of nonviolence in politics.

EP&E 354/PLSC 300/PLSC 623/LAW 20118 – Rethinking the Political Enlightenment
Ian Shapiro
M 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

The calamities wrought by Fascism and Nazism, together with growing disillusionment at the excesses and direction Soviet communism and then Mao’s China, led many postwar intellectuals to rethink the Enlightenment’s promise. In politics that promise had centered on the creation of durable political institutions based on scientific principles that would foster, expand, and protect human freedom. We study the ways in which the harsh realities of twentieth century politics led political theorists to modify, recast, and in some cases reject these Enlightenment aspirations, and we evaluate those responses from the perspective of our contemporary politics. Readings are drawn from, among others, Jonathan Israel, James Tully, Hannah Arendt, Herbert Marcuse, Nicos Poulantzas, Jürgen Habermas, Leo Strauss, Isaiah Berlin, Michel Foucault, Richard Rorty, Alasdair MacIntyre, Charles Taylor, Anthony Appiah, Nancy Fraser, Carole Pateman, Judith Shklar, Quentin Skinner, J.G.A. Pocock, Michael Walzer, and Iris Marion Young. Among the themes discussed are the connections between Enlightenment aspirations and the ideas of modernization, progress, and democracy; the advantages and limitations of periodization in the study of political theory; and teleological conceptions of history.

Open to PhD students in Political Science and to graduate students in other departments and programs by agreement with the instructor. Open to undergraduates as space permits, provided they have completed at least three political science courses, one of which is PLSC 114, PLSC 118, or equivalent such as Directed Studies.

EP&E 362/PHIL 462 – The Morality of Reparations
Stephen Darwall
MW 1-2:15p
Fall 2020

The history of chattel slavery and its long legacy, even to the current moment, is a history of almost unimaginable injustice. What is the appropriate moral response to this history? This turns out to be a complex and difficult question, or set of questions, which we explore in this course. Some of these are issues of philosophical theory, however, of “nonideal theory,” where the questions concern not what is ideally just, but what responses are called for by historical injustice. But there are also important empirical historical issues concerning the precise character of the injustices and who, and what institutions, were complicit in them. We examine, as best we can, the history of chattel slavery and its long legacy: the white reaction to what Du Bois called “black reconstruction,” racist violence and terror, and decades of white supremacy, including segregation in all its forms and, most recently, mass incarceration. Ultimately, however, our questions are philosophical. What response does justice require to this history and of whom is it required?

ER&M 214/HIST 146/HLTH 280/HSHM 212 – Historical Perspectives on Global Health
Joanna Radin
TTh 11:35a-12:25p
Fall 2020

In the 21st century “global health” is recognized as an influential framework for orienting action among a huge range of groups including public health workers, activists, philanthropists, economists, political leaders, and students. How did this come to pass? This survey class introduces you to the historical circumstances that have contributed to the contemporary landscape of global health. We travel through several centuries to examine how ideas about disease, colonialism, race, gender, science, diplomacy, security, economy, and humanitarianism have shaped and been shaped by attempts to negotiate problems of health that transcend geopolitical borders.

ER&M 300 – Comparative Ethnic Studies
Quan Tran/Fadila Habchi
Th 1:30-3:20p/W 9:25-11:15a
Fall 2020/Spring 2021

Introduction to the methods and practice of comparative ethnic studies. Examination of racial formation in the United States within a transnational framework. Legacies of colonialism, slavery, and racial exclusion; racial formation in schools, prisons, and citizenship law; cultural politics of music and performance; social movements; and postcolonial critique.

ER&M 324/WGSS 325 – Asian Diasporas since 1800
Quan Tran
W 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

Examination of the diverse historical and contemporary experiences of people from East, South, and Southeast Asian ancestry living in the Americas, Australia, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Europe. Organized thematically and comparative in scope, topics include labor migrations, community formations, chain migrations, transnational connections, intergenerational dynamics, interracial and ethnic relations, popular cultures, and return migrations.  

ER&M 359/HIST 345J – Gender and the State in Latin America and the Caribbean
Anne Eller
W 3:30-5:20p
Spring 2021

This seminar offers an introduction to historical constructions of gender identity and gendered polities in Latin America and the Caribbean from pre-colonial native societies into the twentieth century. We begin with an analysis of gender in the Inca empire and several lowland societies, focusing on spirituality, agriculture, and land tenure particularly. The arrival of Spanish colonialism brings tremendous and complex transformations to the societies that we consider; we analyze discourses of honor, as well as how various subjects navigated the violence and the transforming colonial state. Our readings turn to Caribbean slavery, where studies of gendered experiences of enslavement and resistance have grown considerably in recent decades. Building on these insights, we analyze the gendered experiences of abolition and inclusion into contentious new Latin American and Caribbean nations of the nineteenth century. In the twentieth century, we consider some of the most salient analyses of the growth of state power, including dictatorships, in multiple sites. Throughout we maintain an eye for principle questions about representation, reproduction, inclusion, political consciousness, sexuality, migration, kinship, and revolutionary struggle through a gendered lens.

ER&M 360/HLTH 370/HSHM 432/SOCY 390/WGSS 390/AMST 690/SOCY 629/WGSS 629 – Politics of Reproduction
Rene Almeling
M 1:30-3:20p, W 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

Reproduction as a process that is simultaneously biological and social, involving male and female bodies, family formation, and powerful social institutions such as medicine, law, and the marketplace. Sociological research on reproductive topics such as pregnancy, birth, abortion, contraception, infertility, reproductive technology, and aging. Core sociological concepts used to examine how the politics of reproduction are shaped by the intersecting inequalities of gender, race, class, and sexuality.

ER&M 401 – Writer/Rioter: Public Writing in the 21st Century
Leah Mirakhor
T 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

In his collection Lunch with A Bigot: The Writer in the World, Amitava Kumar asks “What divides the writer from the rioter?” This class is concerned with unpacking the various ways writers participate in the 21st century world as disturbers of the peace. This century has seen great advances in technology, health, alternative energies, new forms of communication, but also vast consolidations of power, mass incarceration, climate change, poverty, homelessness, wars, state surveillance, and sexual violence. Our current historical moment increasingly asks us to craft broader and deeper connections between personal, local, national, and international issues. This course explores cultural criticism on a range of issues that examine the intersections of history, politics, media, and various crises in the 21st century by writers from a variety of backgrounds: journalists, academics, activists, artists, scientists, and politicians. We analyze how these writers use their professional expertise to craft work for the public arena, and what it means to create a history of the present. The course’s four sections cover various responses to some of the issues most publicly contested across college campuses nationwide, and here at Yale: racial unrest, sexual assault, climate change, poverty, incarceration, fascism, and gun violence.

ER&M 433/HIST 363J/SAST 334 – Mobile South Asians and the Global Legal Order
Rohit De
T 9:25-11:15a
Fall 2020

South Asians make up the largest population of overseas migrants in the world, close to 33 million in 2017 and a diaspora that is almost double that number. This course looks at the unprecedented mobility of South Asians from the mid-19th century until now as merchants, indentured labor, students, pilgrims, professionals, domestic workers, political exiles, refugees, and economic migrants, through the lens of state attempts to control movement and individual resistance, subversion, and adaptation to such controls. Focusing on the legal consciousness of South Asian migrants and the emergence of South Asian nations as political players on the global stage, this class traces how South Asian mobility led to the forging of a new global order, over migration, multiculturalism, Islamic law, civil liberties, labor law, and international law.

FILM 362/FREN 384/ITAL 384/JDST 289/LITR 338 – Representing the Holocaust
Maurice Samuels, Millicent Marcus
TTh 2:30-3:45p
Fall 2020

The Holocaust as it has been depicted in books and films, and as written and recorded by survivors in different languages and national contexts. Questions of aesthetics and authority, language and its limits, ethical engagement, metaphors and memory, and narrative adequacy to record historical truth. Interactive discussions about films (Life Is Beautiful, Schindler's List, Shoah), novels, memoirs (Primo Levi, Charlotte Delbo, Art Spiegelman), commentaries, theoretical writings, and testimonies from Yale's Fortunoff Video Archive.

GLBL 204/HIST 104 – The World Circa 2000
Daniel Magaziner, Samuel Moyn
MW 2:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

The World Circa 2000 is a global history of the present since ~ 1960. The course moves thematically to consider topics including, decolonization and nation building in the global south, crises of nationalism and recurrent authoritarianism, the politics of aid, humanitarianism and neo-liberalism, technophilia, environmentalism and networked societies, climate change and ‘free trade,’ new religious fundamentalisms and imagined solidarities, celebrity, individuality, and consumerism in China, the United States, and beyond.

GLBL 284/PLSC 167 – Mass Atrocities in Global Politics
David Simon
HTBA
Spring 2021

Examination of the impact of global politics and institutions on the commission, execution, prevention, and aftermath of mass atrocities.

GLBL 341/PLSC 450 – The Geopolitics of Democracy
Staff
HTBA
Spring 2021

The threats to liberal democracy are being widely debated, from the US and Europe to developing nations.   In order for democracy to continue to thrive as the cornerstone of Western governance, it must adapt and be relevant to citizens of the 21st century. This course examines our appreciation of what constitutes democracy today and how to apply those understandings to the challenges of the 21st century. Our discussions look at the characteristics of democratic leaders and debate whether America, the bulwark of liberal democracy in the 20th century, is still an exporter of democracy and how that matters in today’s world. We then look at how to protect and adapt democratic institutions such as free elections, civil society, dissent, and the free press in the face of a rising wave of populism and nationalism. The course examines how refugee crises from conflict regions and immigration impact democracies and debate the accelerating paradigm shifts of income inequality and technology on democratic institutions.  We conclude the course with a discussion of the forms of democratic governance that are meaningful in the 21st century and the practicalities of designing or reforming democratic institutions to confront current challenges.

GLBL 376/GLBL 552 Asia Now: Human Rights, Globalization, Cultural Conflicts
Jing Tsu
Th 3:30-5:20p
Spring 2021

This course examines contemporary and global issues in Asia (east, southeast, northeast, south), in a historical and interdisciplinary context, that include international law, policy debates, cultural issues, security, military history, media, science and technology, and cyber warfare. Course is co-taught with a guest professor.

GLBL 452 – The Crisis of Liberalism
Samuel Moyn, Ross Douthat, Bryan Garsten
HTBA
Spring 2021

Is there a “crisis of liberalism” occurring in the United States and around the world? What is liberalism? If it is in crisis, what are the features of the disorder and what are possible responses? Is it possible to believe in the further progress of liberal societies, or have they fallen into a decadent condition? This course meets twice a week and is lead by one of the instructors, followed by conversation among them. Undergraduates meet in a third session with one of the teaching assistants.

HIST 114/HSHM 206 – History of Reproductive Health and Medicine in the U.S.
Miriam Rich
TTh 11:35a-12:25p
Spring 2021

This course surveys the history of reproductive health and medicine in the United States from the late eighteenth century to the present. The course emphasizes the cultural and historical contexts of reproductive health; the significance of reproduction within the broader social, cultural, and political history of the United States; and the entanglements of reproductive medicine with social and political categories of race, gender, disability, nation, and kinship. Topics include the management of reproduction in U.S. slavery and empire, reproductive medicine and concepts of race, practitioners and professional authority over childbearing and pregnancy, eugenics and sterilization, movements for reproductive rights and healthcare, reproductive biotechnology, and present-day disparities in access to and quality of reproductive care.  

HIST 116J – A History of American Citizenship: Membership and Exclusion; Rights and Belonging in U.S. History
Staff
M 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

This course explores the contested history of American citizenship from the early republic to the age of Trump. It interrogates both the relative inclusion and/or exclusion of disparate immigrant populations into the American citizenry and campaigns to expand citizenship status and rights to long-marginalized native-born populations throughout the history of the republic. It especially probes the degree to which policies governing U.S. citizenship have been employed to incorporate access to rights for some while restricting access to others. 

HIST 118J – U.S. Immigration Policy: History, Politics, and Activism, 1607-Present
Staff
M 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

How can we study a history so broad, complex, and evolving as the history of American immigration policy?  This course explores that question by studying U.S. immigration law, politics, and activism from the colonial era to the present day.  Chronologically, we particularly examine: (1) antebellum immigration policy in the context of forced migration, settler colonialism, and slavery, (2) the rise of a federal “gatekeeping” immigration regime in the post-Civil War era, and (3) transformations in immigration policymaking and policies during the long twentieth century. Thematically, we emphasize how U.S. immigration policies have often been framed—and challenged by immigrant rights advocates—on the grounds of racialized and gendered exclusion and/or subordination.  

HIST 170J – Native Peoples and the Making of the Southwest
Naomi Sussman
Th 3:30-5:20p
Fall 2020

This class traces Native communities across the region’s Spanish, Mexican, and U.S. American regimes (between the 15th century and the present). We foreground Indigenous peoples’ distinct geopolitical agendas and explore their innovative, hard-won persistence. Likewise, we interrogate the strategies—displacement, forced labor, genocide, assimilation—that colonial governments have used to dominate native peoples. Finally, we consider the function of the U.S.-Mexico border, and of ideas of “citizenship” on both sides of the border, since 1848.

HIST 171J – The Left After 1968: Social Movements and Progressive Politics in a Transnational Perspective
Staff
W 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

In this reading-intensive and discussion-focused seminar, students examine the myriad afterlives of 1968 with a focus on grassroots activism and the changing vernaculars of radicalism in the last three decades of the twentieth century. Conventionally, historians have marked 1968 as the apex of leftist mobilization, often characterizing the decades after as ones of decline. Without denying the strengthening of conservative dispensations during this period, students consider how the Left lived on through well-organized and powerful movements that challenged structural inequalities through demands for black power, women’s liberation, anti-colonial non-alignment, environmentalism, LGBT, indigenous, and human rights.

HIST 176J/HSHM 465/WGSS 457 Reproductive Health, Gender & Power in the U.S.
Ziv Eisenberg
Th 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

This seminar examines women’s and men’s reproductive health in the United States from the 19th century to the present. How have gender norms and social power structures shaped medical knowledge, scientific investigation, political regulation, and private reproductive experiences? What do the lessons of the history of reproductive health tell us about contemporary policy, legal and economic debates? Topics include abortion, activism, childbirth, contraceptives, eugenics, feminism, fertility, medicalization, pregnancy, reproductive science and technology, sexual health, social justice, and sterilization.

HIST 194J/HSHM 424 – Citizenship, Race, and Public Health in U.S. History
Miriam Rich
Th 3:30-5:20p
Spring 2021

This seminar examines the history of citizenship, race, and public health in the modern United States. The course explores how public health practices structured shifting boundaries of social and political inclusion, focusing particularly on the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. How did public health interventions serve to affirm, regulate, or deny the citizenship of different groups? How have public health issues both shaped and been shaped by systems of racial inequality? Topics include the history of public health and immigration, surveillance and regulation of racialized and gendered subjects, eugenics and racial hygiene, health activism and reform, and ethics of public health powers.

HIST 195J/HSHM 436 – Health and Incarceration in U.S. History
Miriam Rich
Th 3:30-5:20p
Fall 2020

This course examines the U.S. history of incarceration through the lens of health and medicine, covering the late eighteenth century to the present. Across this period, incarcerated populations have been subject to extensive health risks and harms; since 1976, they also comprise the only group in the U.S. with a recognized constitutional right to health care. In this seminar, we explore how medical practices and institutions have been involved in establishing, structuring, and challenging historical systems of incarceration. In the modern United States, incarceration has played a major role in the formation of racial disparities, the regulation and surveillance of marginalized communities, and the delineation of the state’s relationship to its subjects. Within this history, health and medicine have been central to debates over the harms of the prison system, the extent of institutional authority over vulnerable bodies, and the state’s obligations to provide care.

HIST 212J/HUMS 313 – Philosophy of Dissent in Central and Eastern Europe
Marci Shore
M 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

This is a seminar in the field of European intellectual history, based on primary sources. It focuses on how philosophers, novelists, sociologists, and other thinkers developed and articulated a philosophy of dissent under communism. More specific topics include the relationships between temporality and subjectivity and between truth and lies, and the role that existentialism played in formulating philosophical critiques of repression. Readings consist of a mixture of philosophical and literary works from the Soviet Union, East Germany and the lands in-between. Potential authors include Merab Mamardashvili, Danilo Kiš, Józef Tischner, Adam Michnik, Jacek Kuroń, Ladislav Hejdanek, Václav Havel, Jan Patočka, Leszek Kołakowski, Gajo Petrović, Norman Manea, Lev Kopelev, Igor Pomerantsev, Tomas Venclova.

HIST 232 – Hitler, Stalin, and Us
Timothy Snyder
TTh 2:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

This course presents the study of the Stalinist and Nazi regimes, reviews the mass atrocities of the mid-twentieth century, and considers the legacies of these regimes in contemporary memory and politics.

HIST 243J – The Jewish Metropolis: Warsaw before the Holocaust
Karolina Kolpak
M 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

Between the two world wars, Poland was the home of the largest Jewish community in Europe. Its capital city, Warsaw, was one of the biggest and most important hubs of Jewish life―the largest Jewish metropolis in Poland and all of Europe, second largest in the world (after New York City). This course explores this complex story, placing Warsaw, its citizens, ideas and institutions at the center. It begins with the end of the First World War and the establishment of the state of Poland and ends with the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising in 1943 when the Jewish metropolis ceased to exist. It treats Polish Jews as agents not only within their own very diverse community but also outside it, as active citizens of a minority within a multiethnic state. At the same time, it strives to illustrate the various attitudes of the Poles towards the Jews and their proposed solutions to the “Jewish Question” in the Second Polish Republic. The questions of the challenges and possibilities of building a democracy in a multiethnic state; of respect for minority rights and their active protection by the state (or lack thereof); of the rise of radical right-wing ideologies (when, how, why) and the tension between them and modernism; of the significance of human relationships and cooperation across ethnic, religious, etc. lines, are asked throughout this course.

HIST 269J History and Holocaust Testimony
Carolyn Dean
T 9:25-11:15a
Fall 2020

The history and memoirs of Holocaust testimony. How victims' experiences are narrated and assessed by historians. Questions regarding memory and history.

HIST 384J – The Theory and Practice of the Struggle in South Africa
Daniel Magaziner
MW 11:35-12:50p
Fall 2020

Over the course of the 20th century, the white minority government of South Africa maintained power through segregation and apartheid. This course considers the theory and practice of resistance to white supremacy in South Africa, from early 20th century moderate calls for reform, to religious revivalism, trade unionism, Marxist-Leninism, Black Consciousness and non-racial social democracy. Based on careful study of primary sources, students develop familiarity with the intricacies of South African history as well as a deeper understanding about what it has meant to build and sustain movements for social change.

HIST 455J/HUMS 287/GMAN 373/WGSS 347 – Resistance in Theory and Practice
Terence Renaud
T 9:25-11:15a
Spring 2021

Exploration of the histories and theories of resistance in the modern world. How liberation movements, guerrillas, and oppressed groups appeal to resistance as an organizational strategy and as moral justification. Readings include Kant, Thoreau, Nietzsche, Luxemburg, Lenin, Gandhi, Fanon, Arendt, Marcuse, Foucault, A. Lorde, Said, and J. Butler. Themes include antifascism to terrorism; violence to nonviolence, the New Left to Black Lives Matter.

HSAR 448 – The Long 1960s: Art, Revolution, Politics
Pamela Lee
M 9:25-11:15a
Fall 2020

Consideration of the art and visual culture of the “Long 1960s,” treating the art of this pivotal decade against the backdrop of the global Cold War. We consider the most significant art movements of the period (Pop, minimal art, conceptual art etc.) alongside debates on the relationship between art, revolution, and politics both within the United States and abroad. Topics include the rise of media culture and its impact on art; the global reception of Pop; Black Power and the Black Arts Movement; art and activism of the New Left; the counterculture and new media; the aesthetics of Third Worldism and the anti-war movement; 1968 and the Society of the Spectacle; and gay liberation at Stonewall. Mandatory weekend field trip to Washington DC.

Some art history recommended, but not required. Enrollment is restricted and by application. Contact instructor for details.

HUMS 323 – Truth and Sedition
William Klein
W 3:30-6:00p
Fall 2020

The truth can set you free, but of course it can also get you into trouble. How do the constraints on the pursuit and expression of “truth” change with the nature of the censoring regime, from the family to the church to the modern nation-state? What causes regimes to protect perceived vulnerabilities in the systems of knowledge they privilege? What happens when conflict between regimes implicates modes of knowing? Are there types of truth that any regime would—or should—find dangerous? What are the possible motives and pathways for self-censorship?  We begin with the revolt of the Hebrews against polytheistic Egypt and the Socratic questioning of democracy, and end with various contemporary cases of censorship within and between regimes. We consider these events and texts, and their reverberations and reversals in history, in relation to select analyses of the relations between truth and power, including Hobbes, Locke, Kant, Brecht, Leo Strauss, Foucault, Chomsky, Waldron, Zizek, and Xu Zhongrun.

HUMS 349/LITR 470 – Identity in Modern Thought
Benjamin Barasch
T 3:30-5:20p
Spring 2021

Identity is at the heart of our present social conflicts, from campus debates about power and privilege, to movements like Black Lives Matter and Me Too, to the resurgence of ethnic nationalism. But what is identity, after all? How does it come into being? What role do “nature” and “culture” play in that process, and are they separable? To what extent are we defined by our belonging to identity categories such as race, class, gender, and sexuality? How free are we to create our own identities? What makes me “me”? Is there a true self? This class explores the complexities of identity through readings in modern literature, philosophy, and social theory, from psychoanalysis to critical race theory, romanticism to postmodernism, autobiography to autofiction. Authors include J.-J. Rousseau, William Wordsworth, R. W. Emerson, Sigmund Freud, Melanie Klein, G. H. Mead, Erik Erikson, Judith Butler, Hannah Arendt, Theodor Adorno, Djuna Barnes, Nella Larsen, W. E. B. Du Bois, Frantz Fanon, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Thomas Chatterton Williams, Saidiya Hartman, Claudia Rankine, Ben Lerner, Maggie Nelson, Camille Paglia.

PHIL 128 – Philosophy, Gender, and Patriarchy
Robin Dembroff
TTh 10:30-11:20a
Spring 2021

This course provides an introductory survey of issues that arise in philosophy of gender and sexuality. We discuss topics concerning the metaphysics of gender and sexual orientation (such as biological essentialism vs. social constructivism); the nature of patriarchy and masculinity; bias and epistemic injustice; sexual harassment and violence; intersectionality; and feminism.

PHIL 472/PLSC 309/GMAN 314 – Contemporary Critical Theory
Seyla Benhabib
HTBA
Spring 2021

Frankfurt School and Critical Theory focuses on a number of unresolved questions such as pragmatic Kantianism; modernity and post-colonial theory; the idea of progress; critiques of sureveillance capitalism and neo-liberalism. Readings from Habermas, Honneth, Fraser, A. Allen, Jaeggi and others.

Prerequisite: Directed Studies or two or more advanced courses in modern political philosophy.

PLSC 116 – Comparative Politics: States, Regimes, and Conflict
Sarah Khan
TTh 11:35-12:25p
Fall 2020

Introduction to the study of politics and political life in the world outside the United States. State formation and nationalism, the causes and consequences of democracy, the functioning of authoritarian regimes, social movements and collective action, and violence.

PLSC 118 – The Moral Foundations of Politics
Ian Shapiro
HTBA
Spring 2021

An introduction to contemporary discussions about the foundations of political argument. Emphasis on the relations between political theory and policy debate (e.g., social welfare provision and affirmative action). Readings from Bentham, Mill, Marx, Burke, Rawls, Nozick, and others.

PLSC 123 – Political Economy of Foreign Aid
Peter Aronow
T 3:30-5:20p
Fall 2020

Introduction to modern quantitative research methods in international political economy, with a focus on empirical evidence related to foreign aid. The state of knowledge regarding the effects of development assistance on democratization, governance, human rights, and conflict. The challenges of drawing causal inferences in the domain of international political economy.

PLSC 220/PLSC 837/WGSS 220 – Gender Politics
Andrea Aldrich
T 9:25-11:15a/T 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

Exploration of theoretical and empirical work in political science to study the relationship between women and politics in the United States and around the world. Topics include women's descriptive and substantive representation in legislative and executive branch politics in democratic regimes; the impact of gender stereotypes on elections and public opinion; conditions that impact the supply and demand of candidates across genders; and the underrepresentation of women in political institutions.

PLSC 302 – Commerce and Equality: Montesquieu and Rousseau
Heather Wilford
TTh 2:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

This course engages in close readings of the works of two of the greatest minds of the 18th century, Montesquieu and J.J. Rousseau, addressing fundamental questions about commerce and equality, liberalism and democracy, cosmopolitanism and nationalism, and the meaning of modernity.

PLSC 331 – Individualism and Community: Tocqueville and J.S. Mill
Staff
HTBA
Spring 2021

Alexis de Tocqueville and John Stuart Mill were two of the most prominent liberal theorists and statesmen of the 19th century. They recognized that the modern era was to be democratic, and both sought a “new political science” to understand and guide “a world altogether new.” This course will compare their political philosophies, asking how each understood the relations between individualism and community, democracy and liberty, and citizenship and human flourishing.

PLSC 361/PLSC 783 – Democratic Backsliding
Milan Svolik
F 1:30-3:20p
Fall 2020

This class examines the process of democratic backsliding, including its causes, and consequences. Our analysis builds on prominent contemporary and historical cases of democratic backsliding, especially Hungary, India, Poland, Russia, and Venezuela. Implications for democratic stability in the United States is considered.

PLSC 377 – Political Economy of Gender in South Asia
Sarah Khan
HTBA
Spring 2021

This course focuses on the political and economic underpinnings and implications of gender inequality in South Asia. We draw on evidence from Bangladesh, Pakistan, and India to guide our theoretical and empirical inquiry into the following broad questions: What is gender, and what approaches do social scientists use to study gender inequality? How does gender inequality manifest in different social, economic, and political spheres e.g. the household, the labor market, the electorate, the government? What are the cultural and structural drivers of gender inequality? How effective are different approaches to tackling gender inequality in South Asia?

Previous course work in statistical data analysis is helpful, but not required.

PLSC 408 – Human Rights, Law, and Politics in Contemporary Russia
Staff
HTBA
Spring 2021

The seminar is designed to give a broad understanding of the lines of theorizing and types of research that animate the study of human rights issues and human rights mobilizations in post-soviet Russia. Acquainting students with academic research in history, sociology, anthropology and political science on the matter, the seminar seeks to analyze these topics going beyond media portrayals of Russian society and binary oppositions that often structure narratives of Post-soviet social and political reality (state vs. civil society, rule of law vs. kangaroo justice, democracy vs. authoritarianism, repression vs. resistance). This course analyzes how “human rights” have been constructed—as a cause, as a discourse, as a legal and institutional framework—since the Soviet dissident movement, then in the 1990s and 2000s, until today, when “human rights” have become a dominant frame on a number of very heterogenous issues for media and activists denouncing the political regime in Putin’s Russia. It pays particular attention to the sociology of actors, as well as to historical, political and social conditions of emergence and development of human rights mobilizations. The course also focuses on various empirical case studies on highly mediatized human rights issues: political prisoners, protest-related trials, women’s rights, LGBTQ rights, prison and penitentiary institutions. These case studies provide students with a broader empirical knowledge on contemporary Russian society, and serve as a magnifying glass, as they highlight complex dynamics of Russian politics and law in the last thirty years.

PLSC 410 – Political Protests
Maria Jose Hierro
M 3:30-5:20p
Fall 2020

The study of political protest, with discussion of theoretical approaches explaining the origin and decline of social movements and protest. Topics include the conditions under which individuals coordinate and start protest actions; what favors individual participation in protests; and when do protests succeed.

PLSC 412/PLSC 780 – Law & Society in Comparative Perspective
Egor Lazarev
W 3:30-5:20p
Fall 2020

This advanced seminar is about the functions of law across historical, political, and cultural contexts. We discuss what is law, why people obey the law, and how do societies govern themselves in the absence of strong state legal institutions. The class explores the relationship between law and colonialism, the functioning of law under the authoritarianism and democracy, and in conflict-ridden societies.

WGSS 206 – Transnational Approaches to Gender & Sexuality
Evren Savci
W 3:30-5:20p
Fall 2020

Examination of transnational debates about gender and sexuality as they unfold in specific contexts. Gender as a category that can or cannot travel; feminist critiques of liberal rights paradigms; globalization of particular models of gender/queer advocacy; the role of NGOs in global debates about gender and sexuality.

WGSS 352 – Feminist and Queer Literary Methods
Margaret Homans
M 1:30-3:20p
Spring 2021

This course explores feminist and queer literary criticism and theory, the use of feminist and queer literary methods across disciplines, and the uses of literary evidence in gender and sexuality studies. Rather than covering a particular period or genre of literature, the course uses a selection of primary texts in English from Shakespeare to the present, from multiple literary genres (fiction, poetry, drama, memoir, creative nonfiction), and from popular culture and non-literary sources as well as canonical texts. Most of the reading, however, will be in literary criticism and theory and in scholarly writing that makes use of literary methods. Topics include the power of narrative and of representation to create norms; the intersectional gender politics of language, including issues of access, code-switching, and appropriation; the uses of narrative as a scholarly tool and of narrative methods across disciplines; historicisms and presentisms; and art as activism. Students learn to do research in literary criticism and theory, and practice thinking broadly about the cultural work that literature does and about the uses of literary methods and practices in other fields. Formerly ENGL 359.

WGSS 413/THST 441 – Feminist Theater and Performance
Deborah Margolin/Elise Morrison
MW 1:00-2:15p
Fall 2021

Introduction to a range of works by feminist scholars, activists, playwrights, and performers who have used theatrical performance as a means by which to critique and reimagine cultural representations of gender and sexuality. Mapping out of significant theories, debates, and performance strategies that emerged out of the feminist movement(s) of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Students research, perform, and critically engage with historical and contemporary examples of feminist performance work.