Our faculty is at the forefront of legal scholarship in a number of important areas, including issues of law and class, disability, gender, immigration, race, and sexual orientation/identity. Following is a sampling of their published work on these topics. Please note, due to the breadth of research, this is not an all-encompassing list. We will periodically update this site to highlight additional publications.

Diversity Scholarship – Winter 2019


Please see below for a non-exhaustive list of faculty scholarship, as selected from the Yale Law School Winter 2019 Faculty Activities page, that touches upon issues of race, religion, sexual orientation, and gender:

Monica Bell

Monica Bell is an Associate Professor of Law at Yale Law School and an Associate Professor of Sociology at Yale University. Her areas of expertise include criminal justice, welfare law, housing, race and the law, qualitative research methods, and law and sociology.

William N. Eskridge Jr.

Professor William N. Eskridge, Jr. is the John A. Garver Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School. His primary legal academic interest has been statutory interpretation.

  • Religious Freedom, LGBT Rights, and the Prospects for Common Ground, Editor and Contributor, with Robin Fretwell Wilson (Cambridge, 2018)

Miriam S. Gohara

Miriam Gohara is a Clinical Associate Professor of Law at Yale Law School. Professor Gohara teaches and writes about capital and non-capital sentencing, incarceration, and the historical and social forces implicated in culpability and punishment.

  • Keep On Keeping On: Maintaining Momentum for Criminal Justice Reform in the Trump Era, 14 STAN. J. C.R. & C. LIB. (special issue) 1 (2018)

Zachary Liscow

Zachary Liscow is an Associate Professor of Law at Yale Law School. His main research interest is understanding the appropriate policy levers to address income inequality and, in particular, the role that tax policy versus other legal rules should play.

  • Does Legal Status Matter for Educational Choices? Evidence from Immigrant Teenagers (with William Woolston), 20 AM. L. ECON. REV. 318 (2018)

Douglas NeJaime

Douglas NeJaime is Anne Urowsky Professor in Law at Yale Law School, where he teaches in the areas of family law, legal ethics, law and sexuality, and constitutional law.

  • Religious Exemptions and Antidiscrimination Law in Masterpiece Cakeshop, 128 YALE L.J. FORUM 201 (2018) (with Reva Siegel)
  • Conscience Wars in Transnational Perspective: Religious Liberty, Third-Party Harm, and Pluralism (with Reva Siegel), in THE CONSCIENCE WARS: RETHINKING THE BALANCE BETWEEN RELIGION, IDENTITY, AND EQUALITY 187 (Susanna Mancini & Michel Rosenfeld eds., Cambridge Univ. Press 2018)

Robert Post

Robert Post is a Sterling Professor of Law at Yale Law School. Post’s subject areas are constitutional law, First Amendment, legal history, and equal protection.

  • The Politics of Religion: Democracy and the Conscience Wars, in THE CONSCIENCE WARS: RETHINKING THE BALANCE BETWEEN RELIGION, IDENTITY, AND EQUALITY (Susanna Mancini & Michel Rosenfeld, eds., Cambridge University Press 2018)

Cristina Rodríguez

Cristina Rodríguez is the Leighton Homer Surbeck Professor of Law at Yale Law School. Her research interests include constitutional law and theory; immigration law and policy; administrative law and process; language rights and policy; and citizenship theory.

Reva Siegel

Professor Reva Siegel is the Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Professor of Law at Yale Law School. Professor Siegel’s writing draws on legal history to explore questions of law and inequality and to analyze how courts interact with representative government and popular movements in interpreting the Constitution.

  • Blind Justice: Why the Court Refused to Accept Statistical Evidence of Discriminatory Purpose in McCleskey v. Kemp—and Some Pathways for Change, 112 NW. L. REV. 1269 (2018)
  • Religious Exemptions and Antidiscrimination Law in Masterpiece Cakeshop, 128 YALE L.J. F. 201 (2018) (with Douglas NeJaime)
  • Conscience Wars in Transnational Perspective: Religious Liberty, Third-Party Harm, and Pluralism, in THE CONSCIENCE WARS: RETHINKING THE BALANCE BETWEEN RELIGION, IDENTITY, AND EQUALITY (Susanna Mancini & Michel Rosenfeld eds. 2018) (with Douglas NeJaime)

Tom Tyler

Tom R. Tyler is the Macklin Fleming Professor of Law and Professor of Psychology at Yale Law School, as well as a Founding Director of The Justice Collaboratory. Professor Tyler's research explores the role of justice in shaping people's relationships with groups, organizations, communities, and societies.

  • Bounded Authority: Expanding “Appropriate” Police Behavior Beyond Procedural Justice, in LAW AND HUMAN BEHAVIOR (with R. Trickner & J. Jackson) 42, 280-293 (2018)

Diversity matters. It matters for how we learn. It matters for how we serve. And it matters for how we lead. A great law school must offer a rich, challenging, and inclusive learning environment both inside and outside the classroom.”


Heather Gerken

Dean and Sol & Lillian Goldman Professor of Law