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January 15 Tuesday

A discussion with Philippe Sands QC, Professor of Law, University College London

  • Tuesday, January 15, 2019 at 4:15PM - 5:45PM
  • Calabresi Faculty Lounge
  • Open To The YLS Community Only
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Description

Please join the Yale Law School Center for Global Legal Challenges and the Legal History Forum for a discussion with Philippe Sands QC, Professor of Law, University College London, about his book, East West Street: On the Origins of “Genocide” and “Crimes Against Humanity” and his new BBC podcast series, The Ratline

Followed immediately by a short exhibit talk with Philippe Sands on Level L1 of the Lillian Goldman Law Library. The exhibit features Rafael Lemkin, who created and defined the term “Genocide,” and who lectured at Yale Law School from 1948 – 1951.   

Participants are encouraged to read the attached prologue of East West Street: On the Origins of “Genocide” and “Crimes Against Humanity.”

The book has been described as follows:

“A profound and profoundly important book—a moving personal detective story, an uncovering of secret pasts, and a book that explores the creation and development of world-changing legal concepts that came about as a result of the unprecedented atrocities of Hitler’s Third Reich.

East West Street looks at the personal and intellectual evolution of the two men who simultaneously originated the ideas of “genocide” and “crimes against humanity,” both of whom, not knowing the other, studied at the same university with the same professors, in a city little known today that was a major cultural center of Europe, “the little Paris of Ukraine,” a city variously called Lemberg, Lwów, Lvov, or Lviv. It is also a spellbinding family memoir, as the author traces the mysterious story of his grandfather, as he maneuvered through Europe in the face of Nazi atrocities.

East West Street is a book that changes the way we look at the world, at our understanding of history and how civilization has tried to cope with mass murder.”

The Ratline is described by the BBC as: “A story of love, denial and a curious death. Philippe Sands investigates the mysterious disappearance of senior Nazi, Otto Wachter, and journeys right to the heart of the Ratline. 10 episodes.”

Prior to the talk, you might also like to watch a documentary Sands wrote and in which he is featured: What Our Fathers Did: A Nazi Legacy (you will need to be connected to the Yale Network (VPN) to access the film at this link). “This film explores the relationship between two men, Niklas Frank and Horst von Wachter, each of whom are the children of high-ranking Nazi officials and possess starkly contrasting attitudes toward their fathers. Philippe Sands investigates the complicated connection between the two, and even delves into the story of his own grandfather who escaped the same area where their fathers carried out mass killings. Features never before seen home movie and archive footage from the heart of the Nazi regime.”

The Law Library also has this DVD available for check-out.

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Yale Law School Center for Global Legal Challenges and the Legal History Forum

Links

Attachments

PDF icon east_west_street_p.sands_.pdf