November 27 Tuesday

The Rise of Big Data Policing, Andrew Ferguson, Professor at University of the District of Columbia’s David A. Clarke School of Law

  • Tuesday, November 27, 2018 at 12:05PM - 1:30PM
  • Room 122
  • Open To The Yale Community
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Description

This lunch talk is accompanied by a screening of the documentary PRECRIME which features an interview with Professor Ferguson on Monday Nov. 26th, 6pm, SLB 128.

Big data technologies are revolutionizing policing and few people are paying attention. In a wide-ranging new book on the subject, law professor Andrew Guthrie Ferguson reveals how new predictive analytics and surveillance technologies are changing who, where, when, and how police target crime. The book “The Rise of Big Data Policing: Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement” (2017) critically examines the future of these digital technologies with particular focus on concerns about racial bias, transparency, and the erosion of Fourth Amendment rights. Big data policing has a “black data” problem as the legacy issues of racial discrimination, opacity, and distortions to constitutional protections threaten to undermine the legitimacy of these law enforcement innovations. Addressing the problems of transparency, race, and constitutional privacy, and the promise of new methods of crime solving, Professor Ferguson is changing the debate on the future of policing in America.     

Professor Andrew Guthrie Ferguson is a national expert on predictive policing, big data policing, and emerging surveillance technologies. He is the author of the new book The Rise of Big Data Policing: Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement (2017). His recent research focuses on studying how new law enforcement technologies distort traditional methods of policing and the related issues of privacy, civil rights, and community safety. 

Professor Ferguson currently teaches as a tenured full professor at the University of the District of Columbia’s David A. Clarke School of Law where he has been voted “Professor of the Year” four times. His scholarship on the digital transformation of criminal justice has been published in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review, the California Law Review, the Cornell Law Review, the Minnesota Law Review, the Northwestern Law Review, the Boston University Law Review, the University of Southern California Law Review, the Notre Dame Law Review, and the Emory Law Journal among others. In 2017 Professor Ferguson co-authored the law professors’ amicus brief to the Supreme Court on behalf of the Petitioner in Carpenter v. U.S., involving the warrantless collection of cell-site tracking data. 

Sponsoring Organization(s)

ISP, TechSoc