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March 11 Thursday

Law, Economics & Organization Workshop: "What behaviour in economic games tells us about the evolution of non-human species’ economic decision-making behaviour” with Georgia State Prof. Sarah Brosnan.

  • Thursday, March 11, 2021 at 4:10PM - 5:40PM
  • Online
  • Open To The Yale Community
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Description

To access the Workshop, please go to the LEO main page (https://law.yale.edu/LEO) on Thurs., Mar. 11th after 9:00 a.m. (ET).

Sarah Brosnan, Distinguished University Professor of Psychology, Philosophy & Neuroscience and Co-Director of the Language Research Center, Georgia State University, will be presenting from her paper "What behaviour in economic games tells us about the evolution of non-human species’ economic decision-making behaviour." The abstract of the paper reads:

“In the past decade, there has been a surge of interest in using games derived from experimental economics to test decision-making behaviour across species. In most cases, researchers are using the games as a tool, for instance, to understand what factors influence decision-making, how decision-making differs across species or contexts, or to ask broader questions about species’ propensities to cooperate or compete. These games have been quite successful in this regard. To what degree, however, do these games tap into species’ economic decision-making? For the purpose of understanding the evolution of economic systems in humans, this is the key question. To study this, we can break economic decision-making down into smaller components, each of which is a potential step in the evolution of human economic behaviour. We can then use data from economic games, which are simplified, highly structured models of decision-making and therefore ideal for the comparative approach, to directly compare these components across species and contexts, as well as in relation to more naturalistic behaviours, to better understand the evolution of economic behaviour and the social and ecological contexts that influenced it. The comparative approach has successfully informed us about the evolution of other complex traits, such as language and morality, and should help us more deeply understand why and how human economic systems evolved.”

The complete paper is available here.

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Law, Economics & Organization Workshop