The Future of Global Health: A Conversation with Leading Health Justice Activists on What Lies Ahead

 April 18, 2019

Dubala and Headley joined Gregg Gonsalves, co-director of the Global Health Justice Partnership, in discussing changes in HIV/AIDS funding and the impact of activists who have campaigned for treatments. The panel specifically discussed how we can apply the progress we have made in treating AIDS to greater healthcare issues around the globe. Both Dubala and Headley agreed that public health professionals and schools need to approach correcting healthcare infrastructure from a global economic systems perspective, rather than trying to treat one disease at a time. The panel called upon global health leaders to make structural improvements and increased financial investment in primary health systems around the world.

 

 

 

 

 The Unchecked Power of the Purse: How Global Health Financing Sustains Inequity

 April 10, 2019

 In this talk, Dr. Dahn drew from these experiences to discuss the politics and inequities of global health financing, challenges in managing donor funds effectively, and her longtime advocacy for mutual transparency and   accountability in aid and development relationships.

 

 

 

 

 

 The Judicialization of the Right to Health in Brazil

 February 28, 2019

 João Biehl, Susan Dod Brown Professor of Anthropology and Faculty Associate of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, and co-director of the Global Health Program and of the   Brazil LAB (Luso-Afro-Brazilian Studies), visited Yale on Feb. 28, 2019 to discuss “The Judicialization of the Right to Health in Brazil: Enacting Magical Legalism and Prospecting Biopolitical Futurity.”

 His talk, which was part of the Health Justice Speaker Series, explored grassroots mobilizations for the right-to-health and for state accountability in Brazil, against the backdrop of an expanding pharmaceuticalization of care.   Contrary to notions of ‘the end of human rights,’ patients and legal activists are litigating for access to medicines and are rallying for effective infrastructures. As people enact ‘magical legalism’ and affirm an otherwise, they create   the conditions of biopolitical futurity.

 

 

 Beyond Virtue and Vice: Human Rights and Criminal Law in the Context of Gender, Sexuality and Human Rights

 February 26, 2019

 Newly published, Beyond Virtue and Vice: Rethinking Human Rights and the Criminal Law, edited by Alice M. Miller and Mindy J. Roseman, examines the ways criminal law eatures in human rights
 advocacy regarding sexuality, gender, and reproduction, and considers under what conditions, if ever, criminal law is compatible with human rights.


 Panelists include contributors to the book, including: Aziza Ahmed, Widney Brown, Scott Long, Geetanjali Misra, Rasha Moumneh , Wanja Mugunguo, and Esteban Restrapo

 

 

Climate Change and Health Adaptation in the Eastern Caribbean

February 14, 2019

The Global Health Studies Program co-sponsored a talk by Steve Whittaker, a postdoctoral associate in global health and a postdoctoral researcher at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Whittaker presented on climate change and health adaptation in the Eastern Caribbean.

 

 

 

 Drugs, Sex and Policy

 January 29, 2019

The Yale Global Health Studies Program and the Yale Global Health Justice Partnership co-hosted a discussion with harm reduction experts and advocates Cyndee Clay of HIPS and Evan Serio of the Sex Worker and Allies Network. The speakers addressed how fear-based narratives surrounding “sex” and “drugs” are shaping criminal legal and policy decisions affecting people who are engaged in selling sex, using drugs, and related activities.

 

 

 

 

 Embodying Social Injustice: Why Past and Present Structural Racism Matters for Health and Justice Today

 December 3, 2018

 Dr. Nancy Krieger, PhD, will discuss how health inequities in the US today reflect how people biologically embody structural injustice, both past and present.  Challenging the dominant view that the only inheritance that   matters for health is genetic, she will consider the ongoing healthimpacts of the socially inherited histories of Jim Crow and racialized economic segregation.  Using ecosocial theory, which considers who and what drive   societal patterns of disease distribution, Dr. Krieger will explore why thinking historically matters for challenging structural injustices and advancing health equity today.

 

Racial Deprivation on Trial: The Impact of Judicial Activism on Socioeconomic Rights in the Global South

November 14, 2018

Diana Rodríguez-Franco, MA, JD, PhD, discussed the central arguments of her book, Radical Deprivation on Trial: The Impact of Judicial Activism on Socioeconomic Rights in the Global South, which she co-authored with Cesar Rodríguez-Garavito (Cambridge University Press, 2015).

 

 

Resistance and Power: Lessons from 2018 and Where the Progressive Movement goes from Here

November 12, 2018

A conversation with Ady Barkan in which we discussed the implications of the Nov. 6 election results, the need for action in the current moment, and our collective obligation to join and present organizers in pursuit of a better future.

 



Book Talk: The Trials of Nina McCall: Sex,  Surveillance, and the Decades-Long Government  Plan to  Imprison "Promiscuous" Women

October 2, 2018

A discussion with Scott W. Stern '20 and his new book, The Trials of Nina McCall: Sex, Surveillance, and the Decades-Long Government Plan to Imprison "Promiscuous" Women.  Commentary provided by Professor Alice M. Miller.

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Criminal Justice in New Haven

September 26, 2018

The City of New Haven launched a program named LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion) nine months ago to reduce police arrests made for low-level offenses. The City agreed to involve the community in the program's design and management. To date, the City has failed to involve the community in LEAD and has been unable to demonstrate that the program is reducing harms associated with the criminal justice system.