How We Are Involved


Information Society Project

Information Society Project (ISP) is an intellectual center addressing the implications of the Internet and new information technologies for law and society, guided by the values of democracy, development, and civil liberties. The ISP's work includes copyright, media law and policy, transparency, and privacy.

Information Society Project

Events

MFIA Clinic

The Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic (MFIA), part of ISP's Abrams Institute for Freedom of Expression, is a law school clinic dedicated to increasing government transparency, defending the essential work of news gatherers, and protecting freedom of expression through impact litigation, direct legal services, and policy work.

Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic

MSL Degree Program

The Law School also offers the Degree of Master of Studies in Law (M.S.L.) for journalists seeking an intensive immersion in legal thinking so that they are better able to educate their audiences upon their return to journalism.

MSL admissions

Friday, January 05, 2018


Thursday, November 30, 2017


In The Press

The Chinese Hacking Indictments and the Frail “Norm” Against Commercial Espionage—A Commentary by Jack Goldsmith ’89 and Robert D. Williams

LawFare

Robert D. Williams is a Senior Research Scholar in Law and the Executive Director of the Paul Tsai China Center at Yale Law School and Jack Goldsmith is the Henry L. Shattuck Professor at Harvard Law School.

Wednesday, November 22, 2017


In The Press

The police can search your email without telling you. That’s nuts.—A Commentary by Hannah Bloch-Wehba

Vox

Hannah Bloch-Wehba is a Clinical Lecturer in Law, an Associate Research Scholar in Law, and a Stanton First Amendment Fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School.

Monday, December 18, 2017


2:43

Monday, November 20, 2017


21:05

Sunday, November 19, 2017


1:13:47

Tuesday, December 5, 2017


In The Press

What a Technophobe Doctor Shows Us About the Future of Work—A Commentary by Stephen L. Carter ’79

Bloomberg.com

Stephen L. Carter ’79 is the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Yale Law School.

Thursday, November 30, 2017


In The Press

The Chinese Hacking Indictments and the Frail “Norm” Against Commercial Espionage—A Commentary by Jack Goldsmith ’89 and Robert D. Williams

LawFare

Robert D. Williams is a Senior Research Scholar in Law and the Executive Director of the Paul Tsai China Center at Yale Law School and Jack Goldsmith is the Henry L. Shattuck Professor at Harvard Law School.

Wednesday, November 22, 2017


In The Press

The police can search your email without telling you. That’s nuts.—A Commentary by Hannah Bloch-Wehba

Vox

Hannah Bloch-Wehba is a Clinical Lecturer in Law, an Associate Research Scholar in Law, and a Stanton First Amendment Fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School.

Monday, November 13, 2017


In The Press

Spy Court Says ACLU Can Seek Data Collection Rulings

Law360

Clinical Lecturer in Law John Langford ’14 is quoted in an article about the MFIA Clinic and ACLU winning a key victory for public access to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017


In The Press

Amgen Challenge of FDA Decision on Pediatric Exclusivity Could Have Wider Implications

RAPS

Research Scholar in Law and Research Fellow Jeannie Kim is quoted, and the Collaboration for Research Integrity and Transparency mentioned, in a story about an FDA decision regarding the exclusivity of a drug marketed by Amgen.

Tuesday, October 31, 2017


In The Press

Betsy DeVos’ Unexcused Absences

US News and World Report

Clinical Lecturer in Law and the Abrams Clinical Fellow for the Information Society Project's Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic John Langford ’14 is quoted in an article about the lack of information being made public about Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ schedule.

Student Profile Videos


LLM

Ignacio Cofone

A student perspective on law and economics, law and technology, and the LLM program.

In their first semester, all entering students are required to take four courses, one of which must be taken in a small group of 15 or 16 students. Immediately every student in the class has the opportunity to develop a close relationship with one of their four teachers.”


Anthony Kronman

Class of 1975, Sterling Professor of Law and Former Dean