A Robust and Unique Clinical Program


Yale Law School has one of the most robust clinical programs in the country. Unlike most other schools, students can begin taking clinics—and appearing in court—during the spring of their first year. Clinic students represent real clients with real legal problems (not in simulations or role-playing exercises), and are supervised by senior faculty members, with whom they often develop close and lasting mentoring relationships.

About 80% of our students take advantage of this unique opportunity to combine theory with practice, and many students take more than one clinic. With more than 30 clinics, there are almost always places available.

Opportunities abound in the Jerome N. Frank Legal Services Organization—a single law firm that currently houses ten clinics, including the Sol and Lillian Goldman Family Advocacy for Children and Youth Clinic, the Samuel Jacobs Criminal Justice Clinic, and the Ludwig Center for Community and Economic Development.  In addition to the complete list of clinics and projects here, a number of other centers and programs also offer experiential learning opportunities. Simulation courses are also offered in such areas as Appellate Advocacy, Corporate Crisis Management, and Negotiating and Drafting M&A Agreements.

Ways to Engage


Our Clinics

Yale Law School offers more than 30 clinics that provide students with hands on, practical experience in the law on a diverse range of subject matters.

Simulation

Yale Law School offers a suite of innovative simulation courses based on real-world case studies.

Centers and Workshops

Yale Law School enhances the intellectual life of its academic community by sponsoring a variety of centers, programs, and workshops, inspired by the interests of its faculty and students.

Tuesday, July 17, 2018


In The Press

Immigrant Children, Parents Reunified In Connecticut, But What's Next?

The Hartford Courant

Clinical Professor of Law Muneer Ahmad and Clinical Associate Professor of Law Marisol Orihuela ’08 are quoted in a report on the reunification of two children and their parents who had been separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. The children were represented by the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic and CT Legal Services. 

Monday, July 16, 2018


In The Press

Defendants on Probation Can Be Jailed for Drug Relapse, Court Rules

The New York Times

Clinical Professor of Law Fiona Doherty ’99 is quoted in an article about the impact of probation on substance abusers.

Wednesday, June 27, 2018


2:29

Wednesday, June 27, 2018


2:31

Thursday, June 21, 2018


6:12

Thursday, June 21, 2018


2:06

Tuesday, July 17, 2018


In The Press

Immigrant Children, Parents Reunified In Connecticut, But What's Next?

The Hartford Courant

Clinical Professor of Law Muneer Ahmad and Clinical Associate Professor of Law Marisol Orihuela ’08 are quoted in a report on the reunification of two children and their parents who had been separated at the U.S.-Mexico border. The children were represented by the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic and CT Legal Services. 

Monday, July 16, 2018


In The Press

Prosecutor: 2 immigrant children to be reunited with parents

CT Post

Hannah Schoen ’19 is quoted in a story about the release of two children being held in Connecticut and a reunion with their parents after being separated at the U.S. border. The children are being represented by the Connecticut Legal Services and the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic at Yale Law School.

Monday, July 16, 2018


In The Press

Defendants on Probation Can Be Jailed for Drug Relapse, Court Rules

The New York Times

Clinical Professor of Law Fiona Doherty ’99 is quoted in an article about the impact of probation on substance abusers.

Sunday, July 15, 2018


In The Press

Editorial: Connecticut should end practice of ‘prison gerrymandering’

New Haven Register

Ashley Hall ’19 is quoted in an editorial in support of a lawsuit filed last month by the NAACP and the Rule of Law Clinic charging the Connecticut with prison gerrymandering.

Friday, July 13, 2018


In The Press

UPDATED: Detention of Immigrant Children in Conn. Custody Ruled Unconstitutional

Law.com

A federal judge in Connecticut ruled that the separation of two children taken from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border is unconstitutional. The case was argued in court by Clinical Associate Professor of Law Marisol Orihuela ’08. Hannah Schoen ’19 and Carolyn O’Connor ’18, with the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic, are quoted.

Wednesday, July 11, 2018


In The Press

Federal judge delays decision on reuniting children with parents in immigration case

CT Mirror

Clinical Associate Professor of Law Marisol Orihuela ’08 is quoted in a story about a hearing on whether to reunite two children being held in Connecticut with their parents after being separated at the U.S. border. The children are being represented by the Connecticut Legal Services and the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic at Yale Law School.

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