The Arthur Liman Center for Public Interest Law annually funds fellowships for Yale Law School graduates to spend a year working in the United States on public interest legal issues such as welfare rights, homelessness, racial profiling, indigent criminal defense, alternative sentencing courts, immigration, workers rights, and juvenile justice. Liman Fellows start their public interest law projects in the summer or fall after the fellowship is awarded. Fellows provide the Center with periodic progress reports, including a final report at the end of the fellowship year.

The Center provides each Fellow with an annual stipend of approximately $47,500. With rare exceptions, host organizations cover the cost of health insurance and other benefits for the Fellow during the fellowship year. Host organizations must provide and arrange for malpractice insurance.

Interested organizations are encouraged to email Anna VanCleave regarding the possibility of sponsoring an applicant for a Liman Fellowship.

Celina Aldape will join D.C. Law Students in Court, where she will represent low-income tenants, often with limited English proficiency, who are at risk of losing their rent-controlled housing. Celina is a member of the Yale Law School Class of 2017. While at Yale, Celina has participated in the Criminal Justice Clinic, the Landlord/Tenant Legal Services Clinic, and the Liman Project. She graduated from Columbia University in 2014.

Rory Coursey will join the Legal Assistance Foundation in Chicago, where she will expand a Medical-Legal Partnership (MLP) with Cook County Health and Hospital System. The project will provide legal representation and community advocacy for low-income patients facing barriers to accessing medical care. A member of the Yale Law School Class of 2017, Rory has participated in the Re-Entry Clinic and was the student director of the Transitions Medical-Legal Partnership. She graduated from Clark University in 2013.

Ryan Cooper will spend his fellowship year working at the Travis County Mental Health Public Defender, where he will represent indigent defendants whose competency to stand trial has been questioned because of their cognitive challenges. He aims to promote alternatives to detention and incarceration for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Ryan graduated from the University of Texas at Austin in 2010 and from Yale Law School in 2015, where he was the Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Yale Law & Policy Review, a student director of the Green Haven Prison Project, a member of the Criminal Justice Clinic, and a participant in the Liman Project. He is currently clerking for the Honorable Robert L. Pitman of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas.

Lynsey Gaudioso will join Public Advocates in San Francisco, where she work with communities to promote affordable housing through equitable transit policies and efforts to limit displacement. A member of the Yale Law School and the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies classes of 2017, Lynsey has been active in the Environmental Protection Clinic, the Community and Economic Development Clinic, and the Native Peacemaking Clinic; she has also served as the Diversity and Membership Officer for the Yale Law Journal. Prior to law school, Lynsey was a Luce Scholar at the Centre of Live and Learn for Environment and Community in Viet Nam. She graduated from Vanderbilt University in 2010.

Carly Levenson will join Connecticut’s Division of Public Defender Services in the New Haven office and focus on problems surrounding the quality of forensic evidence as part of the office’s newly-formed DNA Unit. Carly will represent indigent criminal defendants whose cases involve the analysis of DNA; she will also create an online database of DNA-related resources for public defenders. Carly graduated from Amherst College in 2009 and from Yale Law School in 2016. While at Yale, Carly worked in the Criminal Justice Clinic, Capital Assistance Project, and Legal Assistance Clinic. She is currently clerking for the Honorable Jeffrey Alker Meyer of the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut.

Hava Mirell will spend her fellowship year as a policy advisor in the Office of Rhode Island Governor Gina Raimondo, where she will develop and implement new policies on restrictive housing, reentry, and probation. Hava will be working with A.T. Wall, the Director of the Rhode Island Department of Corrections. A member of Yale Law School’s class of 2016, Hava participated in the Liman Project and served as an Articles Editor for the Yale Law Journal. She graduated from Stanford University in 2012 and is currently clerking for the Honorable Denise Cote of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.

Nathan Nash will spend his fellowship year after graduation in 2017 at the Lawyers’ Committee for Better Housing (LCBH) in Chicago. There, he will work to expand the Healthy Housing Chicago Medical-Legal Partnership (MLP) so as to protect low-income tenants’ rights to safe housing. Nathan has served as a co-director of two of Yale’s Medical-Legal Partnerships, as a member of Yale’s Mortgage Foreclosure Litigation Clinic, and as a student fellow at the Solomon Center for Health Law & Policy. Nathan graduated from Amherst College in 2012 and spent two years working for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

My Khanh Ngo will spend her fellowship year with the Office of the Alameda County Public Defender in California, where she will represent immigrants facing removal as a result of their criminal cases; she will also help communities respond to immigration enforcement actions. A member of Yale Law School’s class of 2017, My Khanh has participated in the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic, the International Refugee Assistance Project, the Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project, and the Capital Punishment Clinic. She graduated from Yale College in 2010.

Rachel Shur will spend her fellowship year with the Orleans Public Defenders, where she will work on the problems imposed by attempts to collect fines and fees from poor criminal defendants who are unable to pay them; her focus will be on challenging the practice of incarcerating individuals for the inability to pay a criminal justice debt. Rachel graduated from Brown University in 2012 and is a member of the Yale Law School Class of 2017. While at Yale, Rachel has participated in the Criminal Justice Clinic and the Capital Punishment Clinic, and she has also served as a Co-Director of the Capital Assistance Project.

Fellowship Extensions

With the substantial support of the host organizations, the Liman Center is able to offer extensions to four current Fellows.

Corey Guilmette will continue his fellowship with the Public Defender Association in Seattle where he has been challenging discriminatory enforcement of trespass policies. Corey is a member of the Yale Law School Class of 2016 and graduated from Wesleyan University in 2013. During law school, Corey participated in the Criminal Justice Clinic, the Green Haven Prison Project, and the Liman Project; he was a co-author of the 2014 report, Time-in-Cell, which detailed national research on the numbers and conditions of individuals in prison who are placed in solitary confinement.

 

Devon Porter will spend a second fellowship year with the ACLU of Southern California, where she will continue to work on the costs imposed on criminal defendants for their representation and the challenges that indigent individuals have in paying fines and fees.  Devon aims to change the structure of economic burdens placed on low-income criminal defendants. Devon graduated from Reed College in 2011 and from Yale Law School in 2015, where she worked with the Liman Project to gather national data on solitary confinement in prison systems across the country and co-authored the 2014 report Time-in-Cell. She clerked for the Honorable Richard A. Paez of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

 

Abigail Rich will continue working with the East Bay Sanctuary Covenant in Berkeley, California, where she represents refugees who have suffered many traumas; her project aims to develop models for working with clients with histories of trauma. She also works with mental health care facilities that offer treatment for asylum seekers. A member of the Yale Law School Class of 2016, Abigail was in the Immigration Legal Services Clinic, the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic, the Landlord Tenant Clinic, and the International Refugee Assistance Project. She graduated from Washington University in St. Louis in 2009.

 

Jonas Wang will spend another fellowship year with Civil Rights Corps, which is based in Washington, D.C. At Civil Rights Corps, Jonas works on litigation in several states, including Louisiana, Alabama, and Tennessee, that impose undue economic burdens on criminal defendants. A member of the Yale Law School Class of 2016, Jonas participated in the Veterans Legal Services Clinic and served as an Articles Editor of the Yale Law Journal. Jonas graduated from Harvard College in 2012 and received the Ames Award for Service.

Dwayne Betts is spending his fellowship year at the New Haven Office of the Public Defender, where he works to ensure that children charged with crimes are not transferred to the regular criminal court, where they could face incarceration in prison and the lifelong consequences of a felony conviction. While a student at Yale Law School, Dwayne was a student so-director of the Criminal Justice Clinic and of the Rebellious Lawyering Conference, the nation’s largest student led public interest lawyering conference. He received a B.A. from the University of Maryland and an M.F.A. from Warren Wilson College’s M.F.A. Program for Writers. Dwayne is the author of Bastards of the Reagan Era (2015); A Question of Freedom: A Memoir of Learning, Survival, and Coming of Age in Prison (2010); and Shahid Reads His Own Palm (2010).

Kory DeClark is spending his fellowship year at the San Francisco Public Defender’s Office, where he has joined the new Pretrial Release Unit, focused on challenging the unnecessary pretrial incarceration of indigent defendants. Kory earned a B.A. in philosophy at the University of California, Davis and a Ph.D. in philosophy at the University of Southern California. His dissertation, On Being Bound: Law, Authority, and the Politics of Obligation, focused on the nature of authoritative relationships between states and citizens. Kory graduated from Yale Law School in 2015, where he was a student co-director of the Criminal Justice Clinic, and clerked for the Honorable William A. Fletcher of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Corey Guilmette joined the Public Defender Association in Seattle, where he is working to prevent the discriminatory enforcement of trespass policies, which often target communities of color and the homeless. Corey is a member of the Yale Law School Class of 2016 and graduated from Wesleyan University in 2013. During law school, Corey participated in the Criminal Justice Clinic, the Liman Project, and the Green Haven Prison Project.

Devon Porter is spending her fellowship year with the ACLU of Southern California. Although criminal defendants have constitutional rights to state-provided lawyers, many counties impose fees – to be paid after the services have ended. Devon is working to lower these economic barriers through advocacy and litigation.  Devon graduated from Reed College in 2011 and from Yale Law School in 2015, where she worked with the Liman Project to gather national data on solitary confinement in prison systems across the country.  She clerked for the Honorable Richard A. Paez of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Abigail Rich has joined the East Bay Sanctuary Covenant in Berkeley, California, to provide legal services that are integrated with mental healthcare for refugees with histories of trauma. Abigail is working to develop partnerships with mental healthcare facilities to serve asylum seekers with post-traumatic stress disorder; provide direct legal representation to asylum seekers; and create educational materials to assist in serving refugee clients dealing with trauma. A member of the Yale Law School class of 2016, Abigail has participated in the Immigration Legal Services Clinic, the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic, the Landlord Tenant Clinic, and the International Refugee Assistance Project. She graduated from Washington University in St. Louis in 2009.

Jonas Wang is joining Equal Justice Under Law, based in Washington, D.C., which aims to stop practices that result in putting people in jail because they are too poor to pay fines and fees. Jonas will gather information in Louisiana, Alabama and Georgia on the effects of criminal justice fines and will work on litigation challenging their inappropriate imposition. A member of the Yale Law School class of 2016, Jonas participated in the Veterans Legal Services Clinic and served as an Articles Editor of the Yale Law Journal.  Jonas graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Harvard College in 2012 and received the Ames Award for service.

Fellowship Extensions

With the substantial support of the host organizations, the Liman Center offered extensions to several 2016-17 Fellows.

Anna Arkin-Gallagher is helping the Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights to provide civil legal services to young people involved in the New Orleans juvenile justice system. She received an extension to create and staff legal clinics for young people in the New Orleans community and to develop a new project addressing the educational needs of youth held in pretrial detention.  Anna, who graduated from Yale College in 2004 and from Yale Law School in 2009, previously worked in the Civil Action Practice of the Bronx Defenders. There, she provided comprehensive civil legal representation for clients in need of assistance with housing, employment, education, and civil rights.

Caitlin Bellis  continues her work at Public Counsel in Los Angeles, where she divides her time between representing detained immigrants in deportation proceedings and working with a community coalition to establish a publicly-funded program providing counsel to detained immigrants in the Los Angeles area. Caitlin is a 2014 graduate of Yale Law School and a 2010 graduate of Reed College, where she studied Spanish and Anthropology. At law school, Caitlin participated in the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Prior to beginning her Fellowship, Caitlin clerked for the Honorable Richard A. Paez of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

Jamelia Morgan is spending a second year with the ACLU’s National Prison Project in Washington, D.C. on efforts to limit solitary confinement in American prisons. Through litigation, administrative advocacy and community organizing, she is working to build awareness of the particular challenges facing prisoners with physical disabilities who are placed in isolation. Jamelia graduated from Stanford University in 2006 and from Yale Law School in 2013; she was a member of both the Criminal Defense Clinic and the Detention and Human Rights Clinic. She clerked for the Honorable Richard W. Roberts of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.

Freya Pitts continues with Disability Rights Advocates in Berkeley, California, where she works on behalf of young people with mental health and learning disabilities who are confined in California’s county juvenile halls. Her focus is on expanding access to special education and related services and limiting the use of solitary confinement. Freya graduated from Yale College in 2008 and Yale Law School in 2013. She clerked for the Honorable Judith W. Rogers of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and the Honorable Jon S. Tigar of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California. While in law school, she was a member of the Lowenstein International Human Rights Clinic, the Immigration Legal Services Clinic, and the Advocacy for Children and Youth Clinic.

Ryan Sakoda ispending a second year at the Committee for Public Counsel Services (CPCS) – Massachusetts’ public defender agency. At CPCS, he helps individuals who have been convicted or have pending charges to keep or obtain public and subsidized housing. Ryan provides direct services to clients and does empirical research on the interaction between the criminal justice system and public housing policies. Ryan graduated from Yale Law School in 2012 and is a Ph.D. candidate in economics at Harvard; his research focuses on the empirical analysis of crime and criminal justice policy. Prior to law school, Ryan was a Fulbright Scholar at the London School of Economics and a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ukraine. He graduated from the University of California, Berkeley in 2003.

Mary Yanik continues with the New Orleans Workers' Center for Racial Justice, where she provides legal support for an array of problems facing guest workers in the Gulf Coast energy sector. Her work focuses on administrative advocacy, civil litigation, and immigration defense to protect workers who face retaliation for reporting workplace violations. Mary graduated from Yale Law School in 2014, where she particpated in the Worker and Immigrant Rights Advocacy Clinic. Before law school, she was an organizer for United Students Against Sweatshops. She attended the University of Maryland and graduated in 2011. Mary clerked for Judge David F. Hamilton on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.

2015-2016:

Anna Arkin-Gallagher, Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights
Caitlin Bellis Public Counsel in Los Angeles
Dana Montalto, Veterans Legal Clinic at the Legal Services Center and the Home Base program in Boston
Jamelia Morgan, ACLU’s National Prison Project
Freya Pitts, Disability Rights Advocates in Berkeley, California
Ryan Sakoda, Committee for Public Counsel Services
Ruth Swift, Community Law Office, Birmingham, Alabama
Matthew Vogel, Capital Defense Unit at Orleans Public Defenders in New Orleans
Adrien A. Weibgen, Urban Justice Center in New York City
Molly Weston, A Better Balance in New York City
Mary Yanik, New Orleans Workers' Center for Racial Justice

This document provides short updates on past Liman fellows and the work they are doing now, including a breakdown by sector of employment.

Liman Fellows: Nineteen Years of Fellowship
1997 — 2015

2014-2015:
Anna Arkin-Gallagher, Louisiana Center for Children’s Rights, New Orleans, LA
Josh Bendor, ACLU of Arizona, Phoenix, AZ
Emily Gerrick, Texas Fair Defense Project, Austin, TX
Dana Montalto, Veterans Legal Clinic, Jamaica Plain, MA
Matthew Vogel, Orleans Public Defenders, New Orleans, LA
Jessica Vosburgh, National Day Laborer Organizing Network, Birmingham, AL
Adrien A. Weibgen, Urban Justice Center, New York, NY
Molly Weston, A Better Balance, New York, NY 

2013-2014:
Spencer Amdur, Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights, San Francisco, CA
Alyssa Briody, Juvenile Regional Services, New Orleans, LA
Burke Butler, Texas Civil Rights Project, Austin, TX
Katie Chamblee, Southern Center for Human Rights, Atlanta, GA
Jeremy Kaplan-Lyman, Bronx Defenders, NY
Caitlin Mitchell, Youth, Rights & Justice, Portland, OR
Ivy Wang, Southeast Louisiana Legal Services, New Orleans, LA
Alyssa Work, Bronx Freedom Fund, NY

2012-2013:
Chesa Boudin, San Francisco Public Defender's Office, CA
Forrest Dunbar, Alaska Office of Public Advocacy, AK
Romy Ganschow, Brooklyn Legal Services Corporation A, NY
Edward McCarthy, Connecticut Office of the Public Defender, CT
Yaman Salahi, ACLU of Southern California, CA
Rebecca Scholtz, Legal Aid Society of Minneapolis, MN
Sirine Shebaya, ACLU of Maryland, MD
Olivia Sinaiko, Southeast Alaska Conservation Council, MK
Jenny Zhao, ACLU of Northern California, CA

2011-2012:
Robert Braun, Southeast Louisiana Legal Services, New Orleans, LA
Isabel Bussarakum, The Defender Association, Seattle, WA
Elizabeth Compa, Southern Center for Human Rights, Atlanta, GA
Daniel E. Mulkoff, New York Civil Liberties Union, New York, NY
Diala Shamas, Creating Law Enforcement Accountability, Flushing, NY
Emily Washington, Louisiana Capital Assistance Center, LA
Seth Wayne, Orleans Public Defenders, New Orleans, LA

2010-2011:
Seth Atkinson, Natural Resources Defense Council, Washington, DC
Ady Barkan, Make the Road New York, Brooklyn, NY
Monica Bell, Legal Aid Society, DC
Lindsay Nash, Cardozo Immigration Clinic, New York, NY
Megan Quattlebaum, Neighborhood Legal Services Association, Pittsburgh, PA
Elizabeth Guild Simpson, Southern Coalition for Social Justice Durham, NC
Adrienna Wong, ACLU of Texas, Austin, TX

2009–2010:
Alicia Bannon, Brennan Center for Justice, NY
Josh Berman, Natural Resources Defense Council, Chicago, IL
Rebecca Engel, Bronx Defenders, NY
Jean C. Han , Ayuda, Washington, DC
Kathy Hunt Muse, New York Civil Liberties Union, NY
Sonia Kumar, ACLU of Maryland, MD
Margot Mendelson, University of Arizona, Tuscon; Migration Policy Institute, Washington, DC
Kirill Penteshin, UNITE HERE Local 11, Los Angeles, CA
Benjamin Plener, Orleans Public Defenders, New Orlean, LA
Vasudha Talla, Sanctuary for Families, NY

2008–2009:
Justin Cox, CASA of Maryland, Silver Spring, MD
Zahra Hayat, National Center for Youth Law, Oakland, CA
Stacie Jonas, Southern Migrant Legal Services, Nashville, TN
Deborah Marcuse, Office of the Mayor, New Haven, CT
Allegra McLeod, Immigration Justice Project, San Diego, CA
Marisol Orihuela, ACLU of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
Michael Tan, ACLU Immigrants’ Rights Project, New York, NY
Tianna Terry, Legal Aid Society, DC

2007–2008:
Stephanie Biedermann, Disability Rights Advocates, Berkeley, CA
Jamie Dycus, ACLU Racial Justice Program, NY
Leah Fletcher, Natural Resources Defense Council, San Francisco, CA
Dan Freeman, NY Civil Liberties Union, New York, NY
Raquiba Huq, Legal Services of New Jersey, Edison, NJ
Michael Kavey, Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund, New York, NY
Sia Sanneh, Legal Action Center, New York, NY

2006-2007:
Alice Clapman, ACLU Immigrants’ Rights Project, New York, NY
Sameera Fazili, Northern Initiatives, Chicago, IL
Paige Herwig, National Women’s Law Center, Washington, DC
Anna Rich, National Senior Citizens’ Law Office, Oakland, CA
Larry Schwartztol, Brennan Center for Justice, New York
Marc Silverman, Advocates for Children, New York, NY
Charisa Smith (’05), JustChildren, Richmond, VA

2005-2006:
Jorge Baron, New Haven Legal Assistance Association, New Haven, CT
Kim Pattillo Brownson, ACLU of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
Eliza Leighton, CASA of Maryland, Silver Spring, MD
Holly Thomas, NAACP Legal Defense Fund, NY
Sofia Yakren, Urban Justice Center, NY

2004-2005:
Joshua Civin, NAACP Legal Defense Fund, Washington, DC
Cyd Fremmer, EdLaw Project, Boston, MA
Robert Hoo, Legal Services of Northern California, Sacramento, CA
Tom Jawetz, Washington Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights, DC
Lisa Powell, Northwest Immigrant Rights Project, Seattle, WA

2003-2004:
Adam Grumbach, Legal Aid Society OF New York, NY
Kristen Jackson, Public Counsel Law Center, Los Angeles, CA
Grace Meng, Asian Law Caucus, San Francisco, CA
McGregor Smyth, Bronx Defenders, NY

2002-2003:
Tania Galloni, Migrant Farmworker Justice Project, FL
Andrea Marsh, Texas Rural Legal Aid, Austin, TX
David Menschel, Innocence Project, Cardozo School of Law, NY
Amy Meselson, Legal Aid Society of New York, NY

2001-2002:
Susan Hazeldean, Urban Justice Center, New York, NY
Serena Hoy, Capital Area Immigrants’ Rights Coalition, Washington, DC
Joseph Luby, Public Interest Litigation Clinic, Missouri, MO

2000-2001:
Marjorie Allard, Alaska Public Defender Agency, Anchorage, AK
Rebecca Bernhardt, Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights of Texas, San Antonio, TX
Kenneth Sugarman, ACLU of Northern California, San Francisco, CA

1999-2000:
Paula Gaber, Western Center on Law & Poverty, Los Angeles, CA
Juliet McKenna, Lawyers for Children America, Washington, DC
Jessica Sager, All Our Kin, New Haven, CT

1998-1999:
Lisa Daugaard, Seattle Defender Association, WA
Julia Greenfield, The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights, San Francisco, CA
Douglas Stevick, Texas Rural Legal Aid, San Antonio, TX

1997-1998:
Alison Hirschel, Arthur Liman Project on Advocacy for the Institutionalized Elderly, Ann Arbor, MI