Preparing for Commencement


We understand students may have questions about how coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) will affect plans for commencement. 

Yale is monitoring the spread of COVID-19 closely and is consulting with local, state, and federal agencies and experts at the university to safeguard the health and safety of students, faculty, and staff.

We will post any updates regarding commencement on this webpage. In the meantime, we encourage you to follow precautions for your well-being and to review Yale’s COVID-19 website for the latest information.

The Associated Student Agencies are no longer taking regalia orders. They will have extra caps, gowns, hoods, and tassels for sale during cap and gown distribution. Their website will be updated with distribution dates and times when the information is available.

You must verify your diploma name through SIS no later than April 15. Your first and last names must be your legal names. If you also want to include your middle name(s), you may ask that the name(s) be fully spelled out or listed as initials. Note: University policy is that only names will be put on diplomas; no honorifics (Dr., etc.) or other degrees (M.B.A., M.D., etc.) will be included, so do not add either of these to your name on the diploma list.

To confirm pronunciation of your name for the Law School Commencement ceremony, please follow the steps below:

Login into to SIS at https://www.yale.edu/sis

Click on the Personal Data tab. Select NameCoach. Follow the prompts to record your name. Please speak slowly.  Also err on the side of caution—if it is anything more difficult to pronounce than, say, "Mary Jane Doe," you should use NameCoach to record your name.

Check back for archived commencement e-mails that we send to our graduating students.

4.1.21 Commencement Email

4.12.21 Commencement Email

4.19.21 Commencement Email

4.26.21 Commencement Email

GradImages will take individual photos of all who participate in the Commencement Ceremony. It will be possible to order photographs from the their website

Preparing to Leave YLS


Please click here for the most current information on the July 2021 bar exam administration.

Questions about when and where to take a bar exam can be referred to Dean Maldonado. You may also schedule a meeting with Dean Maldonado here.

Questions about the character & fitness process can be referred to Dean Cosgrove

Questions about and requests regarding the various forms completed by the law school can be referred to the Registrar’s Office

Questions about financing the costs related to the exam or bar study can be referred to the Office of Financial Aid

 

Email
Your email account will remain open and active until June 1, 2022. 

All graduating students are eligible to register for a lifelong email account. These accounts are managed by the Association of Yale Alumni and provided by gmail.  You will receive a communication from Yale later this summer with information on creating your AYA account.

VPN
Access to VPN will end on October 1, 2021.

NetID
Your NetID will continue to provide access to Yale Law School and University systems available to alumni, including the COAP online application, websis, and password protected areas of the law school website.

Box Account
If you plan to keep your Box.net account after graduation, Yale Box accounts must be converted to personal accounts before October 1st after graduation. Instructions for converting your Yale Box account to a personal account can be found here.

Further Information
For more information on how to setup an auto-reply or forwarding on your Yale email account please review our graduating students FAQ.

Contact Information
Need assistance have questions? Please feel free to contact Loriann Seluga or email the YLS helpdesk.

 

For students graduating during the Spring 2021 semester, coverage ends on July 31, 2021. Students graduating at a different time should contact the Yale Health Member Services Department [member.services@yale.edu, +1-203-432-0246] to determine coverage end dates.

The Office of Student Affairs surveyed all 50 states in April 2020 and their insurance coverage options. Please click here to view this information.

If your new health insurance coverage will not start until later in the spring, summer, or fall of 2021 (e.g., you graduate in May 2021 and are not starting work immediately on or before July 31, 2021), you may wish to consider short-term coverage. The Office of Student Affairs has provided very basic information about the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as well as alternate short term coverage providers. 

The Yale Health Member Services Department is available to assist with questions about how to transition your health insurance to another provider. They can be reached at member.services@yale.edu or +1-203-432-0246. Please contact Yale Health or the coverage providers directly to explore your options.

For more information about Yale Health coverage please see the Yale Health web site.

Questions you should consider when purchasing a health insurance plan:

Everyone’s situation is different, and some plans may work well for one person and not as well for another person.  It’s important to weigh your options and think about the answers to some of the following questions as you consider which type of plan to purchase.

1. What are my health care needs?  See examples below to get a sense of how a person might answer this question. The answers to questions 2 – 7 will also inform the answer to this question.

  • I am young/healthy, do not use a lot of medical services. I rarely visit a medical provider or require a prescription medication (1 – 3 visits per year, 1 – 2 prescriptions per year as needed, for example: generic birth control pills or antibiotics).
  • I have a chronic condition and tend to use medical services more often. I require multiple visits with a medical provider for routine monitoring (4 – 5 visits per year, 1 – 2 maintenance prescriptions + other prescriptions like generic birth control pills or antibiotics as needed. May or may not include supplies, blood work, lab tests, etc.)
  • I have several overlapping health concerns or conditions. I visit medical providers frequently and have maintenance prescriptions + other prescriptions like generic birth control pills or antibiotics as needed (6+ visits per year across multiple providers, 3+ ongoing prescriptions that support your medical care treatment plan)

2. Do I see a primary care provider regularly (ie. at least once/year)?

3. Do I only go to the doctor when I’m sick (ie. not very often, less than once/year)

4. Do I see a specialist?  If so, how many?  How often?

5. Am I willing to pay a higher monthly premium for comprehensive coverage with minimal copays and deductibles and less out of pocket expenses (see below for definitions)?

  • Premium: A monthly fee you pay to your insurance company to have coverage, even if you don’t use medical services that month.
  • Copay: is a fixed amount you pay for covered medical services like appointments, tests, and prescriptions.
  • Coinsurance: is a fixed percentage amount you pay for covered medical services like appointments, tests, and prescriptions, after reaching your deductible.
  • Deductible: How much you have to spend for covered health services before your insurance plan pays anything (except free preventive services) towards the cost of your health care services.
  • Out-of-pocket maximum: The most you have to spend for covered medical services in a year. After you reach this amount, the insurance plan pays 100% for covered services (non-covered services do NOT count towards the out-of-pocket  maximum).

6. Would I prefer to pay a lower monthly premium for less comprehensive coverage with higher copays and deductibles and greater out of pocket expenses (see below for definitions)?

  • Premium: A monthly fee you pay to your insurance company to have coverage, even if you don’t use medical services that month.
  • Copay: is a fixed amount you pay for covered medical services like appointments, tests, and prescriptions.
  • Coinsurance: is a fixed percentage amount you pay for covered medical services like appointments, tests, and prescriptions, after reaching your deductible.
  • Deductible: How much you have to spend for covered health services before your insurance plan pays anything (except free preventive services) towards the cost of your health care services.
  • Out-of-pocket maximum: The most you have to spend for covered medical services in a year. After you reach this amount, the insurance plan pays 100% for covered services (non-covered services do NOT count towards the out-of-pocket maximum).

7. What kind of prescription coverage do I need?

  • Do I take any prescription medications? 
  • If so, how often and what kind?
  • Most maintenance medications can be purchased in a 90/100-day supply
  • Narcotics are dispensed for no more than a 30-day supply at one time

8. What type of health insurance plans are available where I will be living?  Different plan types have different rules and restrictions, some plan types allow you to use almost any doctor or health care facility. Others limit your choices or charge you more if you use providers outside their network. See definitions below of common plan types that might be available to you:

  • Health Maintenance Organization (HMO): A type of health insurance plan that usually limits coverage to care from doctors who work for or contract with the HMO. It generally won't cover out-of-network care except in an emergency. An HMO may require you to live or work in its service area to be eligible for coverage. HMO plans may require you to have a Primary Care Provider (PCP) and get a referral from your PCP in order to see a specialist. HMOs often provide integrated care and focus on prevention and wellness.
  • Point of Service (POS): A type of plan where you pay less for a service (lesser copay, lesser co-insurance percentage) if you use doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers that belong to the plan’s network. POS plans require you to get a referral from your primary care doctor in order to see a specialist. POS plans allow you to use doctors, hospitals, and other health care providers that DO NOT belong to the plan’s network, but you pay more for a service (higher copay, higher co-insurance percentage) if you use an out-of-network provider.
  • Preferred Provider Organization (PPO): A type of health plan where you pay less if you use providers in the plan’s network. You can use doctors, hospitals, and providers outside of the network without a referral for an additional cost.

9. Am I willing to follow the rules and restrictions of a certain type of plan if it has a lower premium?

10. Do I want the flexibility of a plan that allows me to self-refer to any medical provider based on my situation/symptoms/needs even if it means paying a higher premium?

In Summary:

Generally speaking, insurance plans with higher premiums pay more of your total health care costs. Plans with lower premiums pay less of your total costs.

If you don’t expect to use regular medical services and don’t take regular prescriptions: You may want a plan with a lower premium. Keep in mind, plans with low monthly premiums usually require that you pay more out of your own pocket when you need care.

If you expect to have a lot of doctor visits or need regular prescriptions: You may want a plan with a higher premium. Having a plan with a higher monthly premium usually means that you pay less out of your own pocket when you need care.

No single plan is right for every person, only you can decide which plan meets your needs and fits within your budget. Researching the coverage and costs of options available to you using the questions above will help guide you to make the right decision for you.

 

Alternative Health Care Options

Access Health CT – Connecticut’s official health insurance marketplace established to meet the requirements of the Affordable Care Act, and created to help people choose and enroll in the health insurance plan that is right for their needs.

Individuals and families can review, compare, and enroll in quality healthcare plans from brand-name insurance companies like Anthem and Connecticare through Access Health CT. Additionally, it’s the only place where you could qualify for financial help to lower your costs.

Phone:  1-855-805-4325

www.accesshealthct.com

Agile Health Insurance – offers short-term medical coverage (typically less than 1 year)

Phone: 1-877-353-0962

www.agilehealthinsurance.com

*Connecticut places strict regulations on short-term health plans, and none are for sale in the state as of 2020.

 

Healthcare Marketplace – visit the Marketplace web site to review the enrollment guidelines and determine which plans are available where you will be living. If you will be living in Connecticut, see Access Health CT (at the top).

Phone: 1-800-318-2596
www.healthcare.gov

 

United Healthcare – offers short-term medical coverage (typically less than 1 year)

Phone: 1-800-273-8115

www.uhone.com

*Connecticut places strict regulations on short-term health plans, and none are for sale in the state as of 2020.

 

Please Note:

This list is purely informational. Yale Health provides it as a courtesy and does not endorse the organizations or the coverage provided.

Questions? Please contact Yale Health Member Services at +1-203-432-0246.

Buildings will be closed over the summer months.  Any questions should be referred to law.buildingservices@yale.edu.

Bikes: need to be moved from the main courtyard by noon on 5/14/2021 to the upper courtyard located by entries J, K and L

Lockers: must be emptied by noon on 5/27/2021, all remaining locks will be cut and the contents discarded.  

Keys: (student organizations and faculty offices) must be returned by 5/27/2021 in one of the envelopes located in a pouch underneath mailbox 13 in the mailroom and insert in the slot or can be returned to the Building Services office room 130 Monday- Friday from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm.  Any key not returned will result in a $25 fee added to your bursar account.

Key Tags: All key tags in your possession also need to be returned, they too can be placed in the return key envelope.

Library:

  • Returning students are encouraged to hold onto material until they return in August.
  • Students may return books to the carts outside of the Law Library entrance through May 21st.
  • Note: Students can return Law Library or Yale University Library material at any time to one of the University Library drop boxes located outside the entrances to the Sterling Memorial and Bass Libraries.
  • If you will not be returning to campus but need to return law library materials, please reach out to lawlib.admin@yale.edu.

All Baker Hall Suite Keys must be returned by May 30, 2021. On the basement level next to the laundry room, you will find envelopes and a key drop box. Fill out the information label and deposit into the slot. Any key not returned will result in a $25 fee added to your housing account.

3L Employment Survey:

As an ABA accredited law school, YLS is required to report numerous details about the postgraduate plans of every graduate. As part of your graduation requirements, you must complete a 3L Employment Survey in CDO’s Career Management System (CMS). A link to the survey is under “SHORT CUTS” on the bottom right-hand side of the CMS home page. If you have any questions about the survey, please contact CDO’s Director of Recruitment and Administration, Naomi Erwich.

Plans for 2022 for the Classes of 2020 and 2021


As long as public-health conditions permit, both the Class of 2020 and 2021 are invited to return to campus with their guests on the weekend of May 13, 2022 to celebrate with activities including the University ceremony, a Law School diploma ceremony, and receptions for guests. In the coming months, the University and Law School will provide further updates and information as it becomes available. For now, we hope that you will save the date.