January 28 Tuesday

What My Phone & Computer Do When No One is Looking, April Lorenzen

12:05PM to 1:30PM

SLB Room 129

Personal privacy and corporate security risks can be mitigated by learning little-known security issues swirling around our devices from the grocery store to overseas travel.

February 4 Tuesday

Moral outrage in the digital age, Dr. Molly Crockett, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Yale University

12:05PM to 1:30PM

SLB Room 128

Moral outrage shapes fundamental aspects of human social life and is now widespread on digital media and online social networks. How might these new technologies change the expression of moral outrage and its social consequences? Principles of reinforcement learning can usefully organize an investigation of digital outrage and its effects on social behavior. We used supervised deep learning to develop a digital outrage classifier that can identify expressions of moral outrage on social media with human-level accuracy.

February 11 Tuesday

The Internet and International Jurisdiction - Harmony or Discord?, Jacob Rogers, Sr. Legal Counsel, Wikimedia Foundation

12:05PM to 1:30PM

SLB Room 128

People often conceptualize the internet as a single global community. Information wants to be free, and the internet enables citizens from everywhere in the world to mingle, share information, and learn from one another about far away events. While all these things are true, the reality of the internet is that it presents only a marginal barrier to identification. The laws and technologies of many places, both expected and unexpected, limit what people can do online, and how they can be tracked and identified while doing it.

February 19 Wednesday

Reproductive Due Process, Meghan Boone, Assistant Professor, University of Alabama School of Law

12:05PM to 1:30PM

SLB Room 127

This talk engages in a thought experiment. It assumes that the Supreme Court has correctly identified the constitutional scope of the substantive right to abortion by balancing a pregnant person’s right to liberty with the state’s interest in potential life. Following on this assumption, it asks the question: what else might the Constitution require?
February 21 Friday

Surveillance Studies and Constitutional Law, informal workshop, Niklas Eder, Visiting Scholar

9:00AM to 10:00AM

BH Room 405

The objective of the workshop "Surveillance Studies and Constitutional" Law is to deepen the understanding of surveillance as an object of regulation and constitutional interpretation.

February 28 Friday

Surveillance Studies and Constitutional Law, informal workshop, Niklas Eder, Visiting Scholar

9:00AM to 12:00PM

BH Room 405

The objective of the workshop "Surveillance Studies and Constitutional" Law is to deepen the understanding of surveillance as an object of regulation and constitutional interpretation.

March 25 Wednesday

PSRJ Lecture, given by Professor Khiara Bridges,UC Berkeley School of Law

12:05PM to 1:30PM

TBA

Khiara M. Bridges is a professor of law at UC Berkeley School of Law. She has written many articles concerning, race, class, reproductive rights, and the intersection of the three. Her scholarship has appeared or will soon appear in the Harvard Law ReviewStanford Law Review, the Columbia Law Review, the California Law Review, and the Virginia Law Review, among others.

March 27 Friday

Competition Overdose, Maurice Stucke, Ariel Ezrachi, a book talk

12:05PM to 1:30PM

TBA

Whatever illness our society suffers, competition is the remedy. Do we want better schools for our children? Cheaper prices for everything? More choices in the marketplace? The answer is always: Increase competition.

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