The ISP hosts both ISP-funded and self-funded Resident Fellows, Visiting Fellows, and Student Fellows.

ISP Fellows


The ISP is now accepting applications for an Executive Director.

The Executive Director oversees all aspects of the ISP, and works closely with the ISP Director, Professor Jack Balkin.

The Executive Director will receive an appointment as a Research Scholar at Yale Law School, and is expected to pursue a scholarly agenda of research and writing during the term of the appointment. In this respect, the position resembles post-doctoral fellowships and visiting assistant professorships that combine administrative responsibilities with professional development and preparation for a permanent academic position.

As the day-to-day head of the ISP, the Executive Director will also:

  • Administer ISP initiatives and research programs
  • Work with J.D. students and postdoctoral fellows
  • Build and maintain the ISP’s community of resident, visiting, affiliated, and student fellows
  • Oversee the ISP’s scholarly publication strategy
  • Manage operations: supervise and evaluate full-time staff, recruit and hire fellows
  • Act as the public face of the ISP: build relations with alumni; publish a weekly newsletter; manage social media, listserv, and website content
  • Oversee institutional growth and finances: develop budgets, review monthly financials
  • Fundraise for the ISP and maintain relationships with funders
  • Organize and supervise events: manage the calendar of nearly 100 events per academic year, including two weekly speaker series, workshops, and conferences

The Executive Director must reside in the New Haven area and begin the appointment on or before July 1, 2019. The Executive Director will receive a competitive salary plus Yale University benefits. Candidates must be a graduate of a law school or a Ph.D. program with a distinguished academic record, administrative and organizational expertise, and a record of scholarship, policy briefs, or other publications in areas related to the ISP’s work.

Application materials should include the following:

  • A cover letter describing qualifications, with an emphasis on past managerial and/or administrative experience, and including a statement of the applicant’s scholarly or policy research agenda
  • A curriculum vitae
  • A law school or doctoral transcript
  • At least one sample of recent scholarly writing in English
  • Three letters of recommendation: two letters of recommendation speaking to scholarship, and at least one letter of recommendation speaking to managerial and/or administrative experience

Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis, and must be received no later than Feb 1, 2019. For additional information, please contact Rebecca Crootof (rebecca.crootof@yale.edu). Please submit applications in electronic form to Ann-Marie Cooper (ann-marie.cooper@yale.edu), and indicate clearly that the application is for the Executive Director position.

Yale University considers applicants for employment without regard to, and does not discriminate on the basis of, an individual’s sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a veteran, or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal financial assistance. Questions regarding Title IX may be referred to the University’s Title IX Coordinator, at TitleIX@yale.edu, or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 8th Floor, Five Post Office Square, Boston MA 02109-3921. Telephone: 617.289.0111, Fax: 617.289.0150, TDD: 800.877.8339, or Email: ocr.boston@ed.gov.

The ISP is NOT accepting applications for funded 2019-20 Resident Fellowships. Applications for self-funded Resident Fellows and Visiting Fellows are accepted on a rolling basis.

The ISP Resident Fellowship is designed for recent graduates of law or Ph.D. programs interested in an academic career and whose research is related to any of the ISP research areas.

Applicants must have completed their J.D., Ph.D., or equivalent degree prior to the beginning of the fellowship. ISP Resident Fellows are expected to write at least two academic works per year, to attend all ISP events, be present in the ISP facilities three full days per week, and to contribute to ISP programming. ISP Resident fellows are strongly urged to reside in the New Haven area.

ISP-funded Resident Fellowships normally begin on July 1 and last for one year; fellows in residence may apply for a second year of support. Fellows receive a salary of USD $47,484 per year plus Yale benefits, a travel stipend, and office space at the ISP.

The ISP also offers self-funded Resident Fellowships for individuals with their own sources of funding—for example, winners of Fulbright or other fellowship awards. The application requirements are identical. Please indicate the sources of funding in your application.

Applications should include the following:

  • A cover letter indicating your interest in the Resident Fellowship
  • A research agenda (5 pages max)
  • A resume or CV
  • A law/graduate school transcript
  • At least one scholarly writing sample (in English)
  • Two letters of recommendation

Applications for ISP-funded Resident Fellowships must be postmarked no later than January 11, 2019. Applications for self-funded Resident Fellowships are accepted on a rolling basis.

Please submit applications in electronic form to Ann-Marie Cooper.

Yale University considers applicants for employment without regard to, and does not discriminate on the basis of, an individual’s sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a veteran, or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal financial assistance. Questions regarding Title IX may be referred to the University’s Title IX Coordinator, at TitleIX@yale.edu, or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 8th Floor, Five Post Office Square, Boston MA 02109-3921. Telephone: 617.289.0111, Fax: 617.289.0150, TDD: 800.877.8339, or Email: ocr.boston@ed.gov.

Applications for Visiting Fellows are accepted on a rolling basis.

Individuals living outside of the New Haven area who are interested in regularly attending ISP events and contributing to the ISP community should consider applying to be an ISP Visiting Fellow. Visiting Fellows have included recent law graduates, academics, activists, government employees, journalists, historians, artists, and technologists.

Because one of the ISP’s primary goal is creating and maintaining a sense of community among its fellows, Visiting Fellows are expected to attend at least 3-6 events per month during the academic year, depending on how far away they live. The ISP requests that Visiting Fellows who only are able to attend 3-4 events per month commit to a full year, in order to develop the relationships that make this fellowship worthwhile. Visiting Fellows who are able to attend 5-6 events per month are eligible for semester-long Visiting Fellowships.

Applications should include the following:

  • A cover letter indicating your interest in the Visiting Fellowship and noting how often you anticipate attending ISP events per semester
  • A brief research agenda (1-3 pages)
  • A resume or CV
  • At least one writing sample, preferably scholarly and in English
  • Two letters of recommendation

Visiting Fellow applications are accepted on a rolling basis.  Please submit applications in electronic form to Ann-Marie Cooper.

Yale University considers applicants for employment without regard to, and does not discriminate on the basis of, an individual’s sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a veteran, or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal financial assistance. Questions regarding Title IX may be referred to the University’s Title IX Coordinator, at TitleIX@yale.edu, or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 8th Floor, Five Post Office Square, Boston MA 02109-3921. Telephone: 617.289.0111, Fax: 617.289.0150, TDD: 800.877.8339, or Email: ocr.boston@ed.gov.

Applications for Student Fellows are accepted on a rolling basis.

The ISP Student Fellowship is intended for current Yale law, graduate, and undergraduate students who are interested in the ISP research areas. Student fellows are expected to regularly attend ISP events and contribute to ISP programming. In the past, student fellows have led reading groups, helped draft amicus briefs, organized conferences and speaker events, and founded and participated in clinics.

Applications should include the following:

  • A cover letter indicating your interest in the Student Fellowship, your school affiliation and graduation year, and how often you anticipate attending ISP events per semester
  • A resume or CV

Student Fellow applications are accepted on a rolling basis.

Please submit applications in electronic form to Ann-Marie Cooper.
 

Yale University considers applicants for employment without regard to, and does not discriminate on the basis of, an individual’s sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a veteran, or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal financial assistance. Questions regarding Title IX may be referred to the University’s Title IX Coordinator, at TitleIX@yale.edu, or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 8th Floor, Five Post Office Square, Boston MA 02109-3921. Telephone: 617.289.0111, Fax: 617.289.0150, TDD: 800.877.8339, or Email: ocr.boston@ed.gov.

The Wikimedia/Yale Law School Initiative on Intermediaries and Information, an initiative of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School, is accepting applications for a WIII Fellow.

The Wikimedia/Yale Law School Initiative on Intermediaries and Information (WIII) has two main aims: to raise awareness of threats to an open internet, especially those affecting online intermediaries and their users, and to make creative policy suggestions that protect and promote open access to information. WIII grew out of an ongoing academic collaboration between Yale Law School and the Wikimedia Foundation and is made possible by a generous gift from the Wikimedia Foundation.

The Information Society Project (ISP) is an intellectual center at Yale Law School. It supports an interdisciplinary community of scholars who study issues at the intersection of law, technology, and society. Many of its fellows are recent graduates of law and doctoral programs and plan to pursue careers in the academy or in public policy. The ISP hosts nearly 100 events per year designed to promote scholarship, foster new ideas, and spark collaborations. The ISP is also home to a variety of initiatives including the Floyd Abrams Institute for Freedom of Expression, the Knight Law and Media Program, the Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic, Privacy Lab, the Program for the Study of Reproductive Justice, and the Wikimedia/Yale Law School Initiative on Intermediaries and Information.

The WIII Fellowship is an opportunity for a postgraduate candidate to work to improve global access to information, to draft legal scholarship and engage in policy advocacy, and to participate in the intellectual life of the ISP. The ideal candidate should have a strong interest in intermediary liability, platform governance, access to information, and online content issues; familiarity with relevant case law and legal systems; and excellent persuasive writing and interpersonal skills.

The duties of the WIII Fellow may include:

  • Monitoring domestic, foreign, and international developments involving the “right to link” and related issues of intermediary liability and online freedom of expression
  • Producing white papers or academic articles with policy recommendations
  • Publishing blog posts and op-eds
  • Organizing educational events at Yale Law School
  • Acting as a liaison between the Yale ISP and the Wikimedia Foundation

The WIII Fellow will receive a fellowship salary, a travel budget, Yale University benefits, and access to Yale University resources. The WIII Fellow is expected to live in the New Haven area and be a part of the ISP community.

Application materials should include:

  • A cover letter
  • A 3-to-5 page statement describing the applicant’s interest and relevant experience
  • A resume or CV
  • A law and/or graduate school transcript
  • At least one scholarly writing sample, preferably in English
  • Two letters of recommendation

We welcome applications immediately and will consider them on a rolling basis until the position is filled. The ideal start date would be July 1, 2019, although later dates may also be possible. Questions and applications should be sent to Ann-Marie Cooper (ann-marie.cooper@yale.edu). Please indicate clearly that the application is for the WIII Fellow position.

Yale University considers applicants for employment without regard to, and does not discriminate on the basis of, an individual’s sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a veteran, or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal financial assistance. Questions regarding Title IX may be referred to the University’s Title IX Coordinator, at TitleIX@yale.edu, or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 8th Floor, Five Post Office Square, Boston MA 02109-3921. Telephone: 617.289.0111, Fax: 617.289.0150, TDD: 800.877.8339, or Email: ocr.boston@ed.gov.

The Media Freedom and Information Access Clinic has a number of fellowship positions, including the Abrams Clinical Fellowship, the Stanton First Amendment Clinical Fellowship, and Summer Student Fellowships. Descriptions and application requirements for these fellowships are posted under Opportunities on the MFIA website.

Yale University considers applicants for employment without regard to, and does not discriminate on the basis of, an individual’s sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a veteran, or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal financial assistance. Questions regarding Title IX may be referred to the University’s Title IX Coordinator, at TitleIX@yale.edu, or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 8th Floor, Five Post Office Square, Boston MA 02109-3921. Telephone: 617.289.0111, Fax: 617.289.0150, TDD: 800.877.8339, or Email: ocr.boston@ed.gov.

The Information Society Project at Yale Law School is NOT accepting applications for a 2018-19 Reproductive Rights and Justice Fellow with the ISP’s Program for the Study of Reproductive Justice (PSRJ)Please check this space in February 2019 for the next posting.

The Fellow will have primary responsibility for developing—and in some cases implementing—novel litigation strategies and legal theories designed to advance reproductive rights and justice. The Fellow will conduct this work under the direction of the PSRJ Director, will often collaborate with faculty members and attorneys from cooperating organizations, and will often supervise teams of students who will assist in the development of these strategies.

The ideal candidate will have a significant academic background in reproductive rights, reproductive rights litigation and its particular challenges, a history of activism in the area, and an interest in working with the PSRJ Director, as well as YLS scholars and YLS students enrolled in the Reproductive Rights and Justice Project clinical class.

The New Haven-based position is for one year, though it is potentially renewable for a second. This position carries a competitive salary commensurate with experience, a travel stipend, Yale University benefits, and access to Yale University resources. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until the position is filled.

About PSRJ
The Program for the Study of Reproductive Justice (PSRJ) is an idea-generating institution, an incubator of novel litigation strategies and legal theories designed to advance reproductive rights and justice. It takes advantage of the intellectual capital at the law school—including scholars with special expertise in constitutional law, reproductive rights, and related fields, and our talented student body—to develop legal doctrine to protect reproductive health access. Priscilla J. Smith, the PSRJ Director, also teaches the Reproductive Rights and Justice Project, a clinical course.

Applications
Applications should be sent in electronic form to Ann-Marie Cooper (ann-marie.cooper@yale.edu). Please indicate clearly that the application is for the Reproductive Rights and Justice Fellow position. Application materials should include:

• A statement describing the applicant’s interest in the position, relevant practice experience, and career goals;
• A copy of the applicant’s resume;
• A law school transcript;
• Contact information for three references; and
• At least one sample of recent legal writing, either a brief or memorandum, or a piece of academic writing, that demonstrates sophisticated and creative legal reasoning.

Yale University considers applicants for employment without regard to, and does not discriminate on the basis of, an individual’s sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, status as a veteran, or national or ethnic origin; nor does Yale discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity or expression. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 protects people from sex discrimination in educational programs and activities at institutions that receive federal financial assistance. Questions regarding Title IX may be referred to the University’s Title IX Coordinator, at TitleIX@yale.edu, or to the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, 8th Floor, Five Post Office Square, Boston MA 02109-3921. Telephone: 617.289.0111, Fax: 617.289.0150, TDD: 800.877.8339, or Email: ocr.boston@ed.gov.