Danieli Evans


Danieli’s research is about law and inequality. She investigates the social and political dynamics that produce inequality, and argues for reforms that would make society more inclusive, equitable, and democratic. Much of her work is informed by social science and behavioral science. Her writing spans topics from the criminal legal system and policing to constitutional law and discrimination law. Her articles have been published in the Virginia Law Review; Stanford Law & Policy Review; Georgetown Law Journal; and Psychology, Crime & Law, among others. Danieli’s teaching specializations include criminal law and procedure, constitutional law, discrimination law, poverty law, administrative law, law and social science/psychology, and law and inequality.

Danieli is currently a Visiting Professor of Law at Seattle University School of Law, teaching criminal law and criminal procedure. She served as a law clerk for Judge Diane P. Wood of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit and for Judge Harry T. Edwards of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. She held positions as a Senior Policy Analyst at the Council of State Governments Justice Center, where she advised state governments on criminal legal system policy; a Research Scholar in Law at the Justice Collaboratory at Yale Law School, where she contributed to research pertaining to procedural justice and democratic legitimacy; a Senior Fellow in Constitutional Studies at the National Constitution Center, where she produced educational materials related to the Constitution; and a litigation associate at the Washington, D.C. firm of Kellogg, Hansen, Figel & Frederick PLLC, where she practiced primarily appellate litigation. She is counsel at the firm of Cader Adams LLP, where she consults on matters related to diversity, equity, and inclusion. She holds a J.D. from Yale Law School and is currently a Ph.D. in Law candidate at Yale Law School.

Education
J.D., Yale Law School
B.A. (Economics), University of Miami

Publications